For these 'cyborgs', keys are so yesterday

September 4, 2015
A Kaspersky employee places his thumb next to the grain-sized NFC (Near Field Communications) chip
A Kaspersky employee places his thumb next to the grain-sized NFC (Near Field Communications) chip

Punching in security codes to deactivate the alarm at his store became a thing of the past for Jowan Oesterlund when he implanted a chip into his hand about 18 months ago.

"When I walk into my studio, I just wave my hand at the alarm, and the alarm turns off," the tattoo artist said.

"Whenever someone shows up with security clearance, he will wave and the alarm is deactivated, the lights are turned on... it will start up the computer, the cash machine and so on," he added.

Oesterlund is one of the small but growing number of people around the world who has a grain-sized NFC (Near Field Communications) chip embedded in him.

In fact, so convinced is he that "this is the future" that he has two of them, one in his hand and the other in his arm.

"One year ago it was 'that's just stupid', or 'wow that's just awesome'. But now multinational companies are looking into it," he said, pointing to cybersecurity firm Kaspersky as an example.

The renowned cybersecurity company had brought in Oesterlund to carry out a live demonstration of chip implantation at the IFA consumer electronics fair in Berlin which opens to the public Friday.

The nervous volunteer is Rainer Bock, who works at Kaspersky. After Oesterlund used a needle to put a chip under Bock's skin, the new member of the "cyborg" club said: "It didn't hurt."

'Curiosity a factor'

With a memory of just 880 bytes, the chips are far from the science fiction equivalent of data powerhouses carrying billions of encrypted secret documents.

Rather, they tend to have specific functions, such as unlocking a door or hooking up to an app on a smartphone.

Despite the limited uses, human chip implant manufacturer Dangerous Things told AFP that there are now around 10,000 "cyborgs"—or humans with digital chips in them—across the globe.

The phenomenon is not new, with a club in Barcelona offering such implants to its members as early as 2004, allowing them to gain entrance and pay for their drinks with it.

The human chip implant manufacturer 'Dangerous Things' says there are now around 10,000 "cyborgs"—or humans with digit
The human chip implant manufacturer 'Dangerous Things' says there are now around 10,000 "cyborgs"—or humans with digital chips in them—across the globe

But its popularity has now accelerated with the ubiquity of smartphones, which can communicate with the chips.

Those who have done the procedure admit that for now, novelty is its key draw.

Evgeny Chereshnev, who also works for Kaspersky, got his chip about seven months ago.

"It felt weird for a couple of weeks... Then I started to understand that I've forgotten what it is to carry a badge to work, I've forgotten what it means to open a door with a key," he said, describing how with a simple wave of his hand, he now enters a secure office building without punching in codes or tapping a security card at the entrance.

But such implants are not without risks, warns Kaspersky's European research director Marco Preuss, saying that a smartphone placed close to the chip for instance, could easily pick up data.

A Kaspersky employee has a microchip implanted in his hand ahead of the IFA consumer electronics fair in Berlin, on September 3,
A Kaspersky employee has a microchip implanted in his hand ahead of the IFA consumer electronics fair in Berlin, on September 3, 2015

Oesterlund said he had also weighed up the risk of someone trying to steal his chip through extreme violent means, but concluded that criminals were unlikely to go that far.

"Chopping off a hand is a really amateur way to steal something," he said.

Those who have joined the "cyborg" club believe that getting in early allows them to secure a place at the forefront of a potentially life-changing development.

"Curiosity is a factor," said Hannes Sjoeblad, who also has a implanted.

But he added that a key aim is "to explore this technology before the government starts doing this".

"We want to contribute to the discovery of this platform. That is very exciting in itself."

Explore further: Elliptic Labs develops ultrasonic gesture control for hand-held devices

Related Stories

JPMorgan to convert Chase cards to chip technology

May 12, 2015

JPMorgan Chase will replace all of its customers' debit cards with more secure chip-based cards nationwide, the bank said Tuesday, and expects to have chips on 70 percent of its debit cards by the end of 2015.

Sleeker smartwatches to shine at Berlin mega gadget fair

September 2, 2015

Sleeker and sexier smartwatches are expected to premiere this week in Berlin at one of the world's biggest consumer electronics shows, with both phone manufacturers and watchmakers jostling for a share of the fast-growing ...

Recommended for you

Where can I buy a chair like that? This app will tell you

August 23, 2016

If you think you have a knack for interior design, or just want to spruce up your own home, new technology developed by Cornell researchers may help you choose furnishings the way professionals do. And professionals may find ...

Sponge creates steam using ambient sunlight

August 22, 2016

How do you boil water? Eschewing the traditional kettle and flame, MIT engineers have invented a bubble-wrapped, sponge-like device that soaks up natural sunlight and heats water to boiling temperatures, generating steam ...

5 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Sep 04, 2015
"Chopping off a hand is a really amateur way to steal something," he said.

First rule in hacking:
When your traget is crude - go technical, when your target is technical - go crude.
Lord_jag
not rated yet Sep 04, 2015
This is just awesome. Now he can be tracked EVERYWHERE. On the highways, every store front, everywhere there is an RFID reader his wrist will be announcing his personal barcode is here!

So what's RFID used in? Well you can put them in your shipment so they can be detected as the truck rolls down the highway. You can put them on the merchandise so you can detect any unpurchased merchandise walking out the door. You can put them in your credit card so you can 'tap' your purchase. You can put them in a keycard so you can touch it to the reader and open doors.

Or you can put them in your hand so anyone.... ANYONE can track your every movement.

Brilliant advancement for fascism.
docile
Sep 04, 2015
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
antigoracle
not rated yet Sep 04, 2015
"Chopping off a hand is a really amateur way to steal something," he said.

Uh huh, and tattoo parlours only attract the professionals.
Nik_2213
not rated yet Sep 05, 2015
Are these related to 'pet chips' ? Those can be read by an inconspicuous device at six-inch range or beyond, depending on scan-loop size. Trivial, surely, to tweak a micro-controller to replay such codes...

I must hope these 'RFID Cyborg' wannabes use the same care as contactless pay-card / passport users and shield their implant when not required...

Now, if it is a 'rolling code' per car keys, that raises the bar.

I believe a cigar cutter is the device of choice for such villainy...

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.