Electrons moving in a magnetic field exhibit strange quantum behavior

Aug 08, 2014
Electrons moving in a magnetic field exhibit strange quantum behavior
Electrons moving in a magnetic field rotate at three frequencies—0, the Larmor frequency (Ω), and the cyclotron frequency (2Ω)—depending on the quantum number describing their angular momentum (m).

The dynamic behavior of electrons in magnetic fields is crucial for understanding physical processes, such as the quantum Hall effect, which are important in many areas of solid state physics, including electrical conductivity. Yet, there is much that remains unknown about exactly how electrons behave in a magnetic field.

In research published today in Nature Communications, researchers Franco Nori and Konstantin Bliokh from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science in Japan, in collaboration with an experimental team in Austria, have made the first direct observations of free-electron Landau states—a form of quantized states that electrons adopt when moving through a —and found that the internal rotational dynamics of quantum electrons, or how they move through the field, is surprisingly different from the classical model, and in line with recent quantum-mechanical predictions made at RIKEN.

The experimental team used a transmission electron microscope to generate nanometer-sized electron vortex beams in which the electrons had a variety of quantum angular-momentum states, and then analyzed the beam propagation to reconstruct the rotational dynamics of the electrons in different Landau states. According to classical physics, the electrons should rotate uniformly at what is called the cyclotron frequency, the frequency adopted by a charged particle moving through a magnetic field. Remarkably, what the researchers discovered is that in fact, depending on the quantum number describing the angular momentum, the electrons rotated in three different ways with zero frequency, the cyclotron frequency, and the Larmor frequency, which is half the cyclotron frequency. This shows that the rotational dynamics of the electrons are more complex and intriguing than was once believed.

According to Franco Nori, who leads the RIKEN team, "This is a very exciting finding, and it will contribute to a better understanding of the fundamental quantum features of in magnetic fields, and help us to reach a better understanding of Landau states and various related physical phenomena."

Explore further: Arrays of electrons trapped in nanoscale circuitry could form the basis for future scalable quantum computers

More information: P. Schattschneider, Th. Schachinger, M. Stöger-Pollach, S. Löffler, A. Steiger-Thirsfeld, K.Y. Bliokh & Franco Nori, Imaging the Dynamics of Free-Electron Landau States, Nature Communications, 2014 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms5586

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gwsystem
5 / 5 (1) Aug 09, 2014
We can think of ternary chips?
arom
1 / 5 (1) Aug 09, 2014
The dynamic behavior of electrons in magnetic fields is crucial for understanding physical processes,…. Yet, there is much that remains unknown about exactly how electrons behave in a magnetic field.
…….
According to Franco Nori, who leads the RIKEN team, "This is a very exciting finding, and it will contribute to a better understanding of the fundamental quantum features of electrons in magnetic fields,….


This is an interesting experiment result, unfortunately up to now we still do not understand why and how electron spin could create its own magnetic field which then acts like a tiny magnet. Knowing the working mechanism like this one, could help the research ….
http://www.vacuum...21〈=en
George_Rajna
Aug 11, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
no fate
5 / 5 (1) Aug 14, 2014
Considering the electron magnetic moment there are only three possible magnetic interactions for an electron entering an external field, hence the three states and their "0, 1/2,1" graduation, with the pole orientation upon entering the field dictating which state is observed.

KBK
1 / 5 (1) Aug 15, 2014
As far as public science goes, the Japanese are ahead of the game. from 2003 to 2012, Mitsubishi heavy industries conducted tests on transmutation--- and achieved just that. Then they announced it to the world. Toyota repeated the works and came up with the same answers in 2012-2013.

The next stage is the proton-neutron genesis for transmutation of all the elements. this requires the three given states that are the subject of this article.

If you haven't been paying attention in these areas or have yet to hear of these acts of transmutation, then you are well behind the curve of where all of science is headed.

This is no joke, research what I say here, and you will find it. This is the end of all scarcity and the end of all capacities for market control, and thus, the end of all capacity to limit human endeavor.