NASA sees Typhoon Rammasun exit the Philippines

Jul 16, 2014

Typhoon Rammasun passed through the central Philippines overnight and NASA satellite imagery showed that the storm's center moved into the South China Sea. NASA's TRMM satellite showed the soaking rains that Rammasun brought to the Philippines as it tracked from east to west.

Before Rammasun made landfall, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite passed over the storm and measured cloud heights and rainfall rates. On July 14, 2014 at 18:19 UTC (2:19 p.m. EDT), TRMM spotted powerful, high thunderstorms reaching heights of almost 17km (10.5 miles). Rain was measured falling at a rate of almost 102 mm (about 4 inches) per hour and that heavy rainfall continued as Rammasun made landfall in the central Philippines.

Rammasun made landfall near Legazpi City on July 15. Legazpi is the capital city of the province of Albay in the Philippines, located on the east coast.

On July 16, 2014 at 02:40 UTC (July 15 at 10:40 p.m. EDT) Typhoon Rammasun had already crossed the Philippines and entered the South China Sea when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument provides high-resolution imagery and captured Rammasun after it moved west of Manila. The eye of the had become obscured by clouds and was not apparent in the MODIS image. The typhoon also appeared somewhat elongated in a west-to-east direction.

On July 16 at 09:00 UTC (5 a.m. EDT), Typhoon Rammasun's maximum sustained winds were near 80 knots (92.0 mph/148.2 kph). The center was in the South China Sea, near 15.4 north latitude and 118.5 east longitude. It was about 114 nautical miles west-northwest of Manila and was moving to the northwest at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph). The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Rammasun to strengthen to 105 knots (120.8 mph/194.5 kph) by July 18 before weakening again.

Typhoon Rammasun is expected to pass north of Hainan Island, China on July 18 around 0600 UTC (2 a.m. EDT). As a result, China Meteorological Administration (CMA) noted that Typhoon standby signal No 1 is expected to be raised today, July 16 as Typhoon Rammasun is expected to pass within about 500 miles (~ 800 kilometers) from Hong Kong.

The CMA expects Rammasun to approach the coastal area of eastern Hainan Island to western Guangxi on the mainland. Rammasun is forecast to make its next landfall at Lingshui, Hainan Island, and then in Yangjiang of the Guangdong Province of mainland China, early (local time) on July 18.

Explore further: NASA sees Typhoon Rammasun's eye staring at Visayas, Philippines

More information: For current watches and warnings from CMA, visit: www.cma.gov.cn/en/WeatherWarni… 20140716_252541.html.

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA sees Tropical Storm 9 over Guam

Jul 11, 2014

Guam and surrounding areas were under a Tropical Storm Warning and Watch on July 11 as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. During the early morning hours on July 11, Tropical Depression 09W strengthened ...

NASA sees rainfall in newborn Tropical Depression 8W

Jul 03, 2014

Powerful thunderstorms in some areas of newborn Tropical Depression 08W in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean were dropping heavy rainfall on July 3 as NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite ...

NASA satellites see Neoguri grow into a super typhoon

Jul 07, 2014

From July 4 to July 7 Tropical Cyclone Neoguri strengthened from a tropical storm into a supertyphoon. NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites passed over the rapidly intensifying storm and provided forecasters ...

Recommended for you

Methane is leaking from permafrost offshore Siberia

10 hours ago

Yamal Peninsula in Siberia has recently become world famous. Spectacular sinkholes, appeared as out of nowhere in the permafrost of the area, sparking the speculations of significant release of greenhouse ...

New discovery in Arctic is a very old clam

10 hours ago

The rapidly thawing Arctic Ocean may be a new frontier but some of the latest news from there concerns a clam that is believed to date back more than a million years.

Barren deserts can host complex ecosystems in their soils

10 hours ago

"Biological soil crusts" don't look like much. In fact, people often trample right over these dark, or green-tinted, sometimes raised patches in the desert soil. But these scruffy stretches can house delicate ...

Researchers on expedition to solve 'small island problem'

11 hours ago

Researchers from the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering are starting their new year with an expedition to the island of South Georgia to carry out research into improving weather forecasting. You can follow the team's progress on their blog. ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.