NASA spots fourteenth tropical cyclone of Southern Indian Ocean season

Feb 07, 2014 by Rob Gutro
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 14S on Feb. 7 and captured this infrared image. The strongest thunderstorms (red) are north of the center. Credit: NRL/NASA

The fourteenth tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season was born as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.

On February 7 at 0900 UTC/4 a.m. EST, Tropical Cyclone 14S had near 35 knots/40 mph/62 kph. It was located about 814 nautical miles/936.7 miles/1,508 km east-northeast of Port Louis, Mauritius near 14.8 south and 70.4 east. At that time, 14S was moving to the south near 8 knots/9.2 mph/14.8 kph.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that multispectral satellite imagery showed that the low-level center is exposed to outside winds and that the center is actually elongated (not a good thing for maintaining strength).

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone 14S on February 7 and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured infrared data. Cloud top temperatures in excess of -70C/-94F were seen north of the center of circulation indicating strong convection and powerful thunderstorms.

14S has since turned to the southeast and is expected to intensify a little before turning southwest and weakening.

Explore further: NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Edilson leaving Mauritius

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Tropical Storm Dolly forms, threatens Mexico

8 hours ago

Tropical Storm Dolly formed off Mexico's northeastern coast on Tuesday and headed toward landfall in Tamaulipas state, threatening to spark floods and mudslides, forecasters said.

Giant garbage patches help redefine ocean boundaries

11 hours ago

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an area of environmental concern between Hawaii and California where the ocean surface is marred by scattered pieces of plastic, which outweigh plankton in that part of ...

New satellite maps out Napa Valley earthquake

12 hours ago

Scientists have used a new Earth-observation satellite called Sentinel-1A to map the ground movements caused by the earthquake that shook up California's wine-producing Napa Valley on 24 August 2014.

User comments : 0