Lawrence Livermore to build super laser for ELI facility in Czech Republic

February 6, 2014 by Bob Yirka report
A CAD image of the ELI-HAPLS laser.

(Phys.org) —Representatives for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have announced that researchers and engineers there have been hard at work constructing a "High Repetition-Rate Advanced Petawatt Laser System" (HAPLS)—a laser unlike anything else ever built. The new laser once finished will be transported to Dolní Břežany near Prague, site of the European Union's Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI) called ELI Beamlines

ELI Beamlines is a project similar to CERN, in that its development is the result of International cooperation and investment—though both remain firmly European based. ELI Beamlines is to become for lasers what CERN has been for particle accelerators—a facility for the world's best scientists to conduct leading edge experiments—it will house some of the most powerful and advanced lasers ever built. Among that collection will be HAPLS, a laser that produces rapidly flickering (10 per second) beams, each just 30 femtoseconds in duration at 30 joules a shot—100 times more powerful than LLNL's most powerful laser to date—with peak power greater than 1 petawatt. In so doing it will be capable of generating secondary sources of radiation and speeding up charged particles. That will make it ideally suited for an enormous variety of research applications—from biology to physics and medicine—even to materials science. Scientists also envision a whole host of industrial research applications as well.

Scientists around the world are expected to be drawn to ELI Beamlines to use the lasers to test theories regarding the cosmos—to emulate what happens with pulsars, for example or to gain more understanding of how matter behaves inside of different stars—all possible because the energy from the short bursts of light will be on par with such massive energy producers, if only for a very short period of time. HAPLS is also considered as a possible blueprint for the construction of nuclear fusion facilities some time in the distant future.

ELI Beamlines is projected to come online in 2017 and to go into full operation the year after, offering scientists unprecedented access to extraordinarily powerful lasers—what they learn as a result could have far reaching implications well into the future.

Explore further: EU to build most powerful laser ever in Prague

More information: www.llnl.gov/news/newsreleases/2013/Sep/NR-13-09-06.html#.UvN1OfldVfe

Related Stories

EU to build most powerful laser ever in Prague

April 28, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- As part of the European Union's commitment to remaining at the forefront of technology, the European Commission (the governing body of the European Union) has laid out plans for three initial high powered ...

Super lasers in Europe? You bet

May 18, 2011

Gaining and maintaining a strong foothold in the European and global technology markets is high on the EU agenda. Helping meet this goal is the ELI ('Extreme light infrastructure') project, which clinched EUR 6 million under ...

Omega Laser Facility completes record 25,000 experiments

November 5, 2013

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced that the Omega Laser Facility, a national user facility for NNSA that is located at and operated by the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics ...

A powerful new class of lasers is in the making

November 20, 2013

Laser intensities have increased dramatically in recent years, opening up a whole new world of applications. To boost scientific research and economic competitiveness the EU is backing a bold new project to create the world's ...

Recommended for you

Long-sought chiral anomaly detected in crystalline material

September 3, 2015

A study by Princeton researchers presents evidence for a long-sought phenomenon—first theorized in the 1960s and predicted to be found in crystals in 1983—called the "chiral anomaly" in a metallic compound of sodium and ...

Probing the limits of wind power generation

September 2, 2015

(Phys.org)—Wind turbine farms now account for an estimated 3.3 percent of electricity generation in the United States, and 2.9 percent of electricity generated globally. The wind turbine industry is growing along all vectors, ...

2 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Osiris1
not rated yet Feb 06, 2014
Looks like a fine piece of work to use in a laser initiated fusion reactor. Good start, especially high repetition rate!
Osteta
Feb 07, 2014
This comment has been removed by a moderator.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.