New MIT technology allows 3D image interaction

Jan 02, 2014
In a Nov. 26, 2013, photo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology graduate student Sean Follmer demonstrates inFORM technology on campus in Cambridge, Mass. Follmer, a researcher with MIT's Tangible Media Group, moves his hands in front of a depth-sensing camera which sends signals to a motorized pin screen in another location where a 3D image pops up to manipulate the red ball. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

(AP)—Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found a way to allow people in one place to interact with three-dimensional versions of people or objects in a different location.

MIT's Tangible Media Group calls the technology inFORM. A person in one location moves or puts an object in front of a depth-sensing camera. That camera sends signals to a motorized pin screen somewhere else and that's where the 3D image pops up. If someone on is moving his hands, for example, that movement would show up on the pin screen in another location.

They hope the technology can eventually be used by urban planners and architects. It could also be used by doctors and others who need to look at CT scans.

In a Nov. 26, 2013, photo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology graduate student Sean Follmer looks towards his image on a computer screen as he demonstrates inFORM technology on campus in Cambridge, Mass. Follmer, a researcher with MIT's Tangible Media Group, moves his hands in front of a depth-sensing camera, which sends signals to a motorized pin screen, far left, where a 3D image pops up to manipulate the red ball. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

In a Nov. 26, 2013, photo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology graduate student Sean Follmer demonstrates inFORM technology on campus in Cambridge, Mass. Follmer, a researcher with MIT's Tangible Media Group, moves his hands in front of a depth-sensing camera, above, which sends signals to a motorized pin screen, below, where a 3D image pops up to manipulate the red ball. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

In a Nov. 26, 2013, photo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology graduate student Sean Follmer demonstrates inFORM technology on campus in Cambridge, Mass. Follmer, a researcher with MIT's Tangible Media Group, moves his hands in front of a depth-sensing camera, above, which sends signals to a motorized pin screen, below, where a 3D image pops up to manipulate the red ball. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)


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