Related topics: iphone · nasa · digital camera

Deciphering the deep dynamics of electric charge

Research led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Marti Checa and Liam Collins has pioneered a groundbreaking approach, described in the journal Nature Communications, toward understanding the behavior of an electric charge ...

Learning to read in times of alternative facts

The child runs a finger along the lines of text, painstakingly mouthing the words. Teaching children to read and write has always been a major task for our schools, but developments in society require a new, broader view ...

Researchers explore how fractures nucleate, propagate and stop

Here's a moment that almost everyone has experienced—you drop your phone screen down on a hard surface and hear the telltale crunch. The screen is cracked but you don't know how bad. You pick up the phone and survey the ...

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Camera

A camera is a device that records images, either as a still photograph or as moving images known as videos or movies. The term comes from the camera obscura (Latin for "dark chamber"), an early mechanism of projecting images where an entire room functioned as a real-time imaging system; the modern camera evolved from the camera obscura.

Cameras may work with the light of the visible spectrum or with other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. A camera generally consists of an enclosed hollow with an opening (aperture) at one end for light to enter, and a recording or viewing surface for capturing the light at the other end. A majority of cameras have a lens positioned in front of the camera's opening to gather the incoming light and focus all or part of the image on the recording surface. The diameter of the aperture is often controlled by a diaphragm mechanism, but some cameras have a fixed-size aperture.

A typical still camera takes one photo each time the user presses the shutter button. A typical movie camera continuously takes 24 film frames per second as long as the user holds down the shutter button.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA