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Unraveling the physics behind tossing fried rice

A pair of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology has unraveled the physics behind the optimal way to toss fried rice while it is cooking. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Hungtang ...

Growing crystals to generate random numbers

A team at the University of Glasgow has developed a novel way to generate random numbers by using the randomness inherent in crystal growth. In their paper published in the journal Matter, the group describes using chemistry ...

An ultrafast microscope for the quantum world

The operation of components for future computers can now be filmed in HD quality, so to speak. Manish Garg and Klaus Kern, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in Stuttgart, have developed a microscope ...

First results from the Dark Energy Survey

The Dark Energy Survey (DES) program uses the patterns of cosmic structure as seen in the spatial distribution of hundreds of millions of galaxies to reveal the nature of "dark energy," the source of cosmic acceleration. ...

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Camera

A camera is a device that records images, either as a still photograph or as moving images known as videos or movies. The term comes from the camera obscura (Latin for "dark chamber"), an early mechanism of projecting images where an entire room functioned as a real-time imaging system; the modern camera evolved from the camera obscura.

Cameras may work with the light of the visible spectrum or with other portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. A camera generally consists of an enclosed hollow with an opening (aperture) at one end for light to enter, and a recording or viewing surface for capturing the light at the other end. A majority of cameras have a lens positioned in front of the camera's opening to gather the incoming light and focus all or part of the image on the recording surface. The diameter of the aperture is often controlled by a diaphragm mechanism, but some cameras have a fixed-size aperture.

A typical still camera takes one photo each time the user presses the shutter button. A typical movie camera continuously takes 24 film frames per second as long as the user holds down the shutter button.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA