Amazon to run digital, print Conde Nast subscriptions

August 20, 2013
US magazine publisher Conde Nast said Tuesday it would outsource to online giant Amazon the management of both its print and digital subscriptions.

US magazine publisher Conde Nast said Tuesday it would outsource to online giant Amazon the management of both its print and digital subscriptions.

The deal called "All Access" allows consumers to use their Amazon account to purchase, manage and renew their print and digital .

It also gives immediate access to their digital magazines on their such as Kindle Fire, iPad, Android tablets and phones.

Conde Nast titles Vogue, Glamour, Bon Appetit, Lucky, Golf Digest, Vanity Fair and Wired will be first in the system, with the remaining brands joining later in the year.

"Combining Conde Nast's must-have content with Amazon's One-Click shopping platform is a huge win," said Bob Sauerberg, president of Conde Nast.

"Our influential and loyal customers want to be the first to know, purchase and share, which is why we wanted to be the first to develop a service like 'All Access' with Amazon, the world's most trusted and proven e-commerce platform."

Amazon's Russ Grandinetti said, "Customers are increasingly consuming magazine content in both print and digital formats, and 'All Access' allows them to subscribe to both in a very easy way, and read content digitally on whatever device or platform they use."

Explore further: Magazine publishers creating 'iTunes for magazines': reports

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