German minister: Drop Google, Facebook if you fear US spying

Jul 03, 2013

Internet users worried about their personal information being intercepted by U.S. intelligence agencies should stop using websites that send data to the United States, Germany's top security official said Wednesday.

NSA leaker Edward Snowden claimed Google, Facebook and Microsoft were among several Internet companies to give the U.S. National Security Agency access to their users' data under a program known as PRISM. The companies have contested this, but the claims prompted outrage in Europe and calls for tighter international rules on data protection.

"Whoever fears their communication is being intercepted in any way should use services that don't go through American servers," German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich said.

He also said German officials are in touch with their U.S. counterparts "on all levels" and a delegation is scheduled to fly to Washington next week to discuss the claims that ordinary citizens—and even European diplomats—were being spied upon by the NSA.

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User comments : 5

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antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (2) Jul 03, 2013
should use services that don't go through American servers

Not really a solution, as with ultimate control over the DNS root server the NSA can just reroute any data they want via US servers.
mosahlah
1 / 5 (4) Jul 20, 2013
Thank goodness. Sanity has prevailed. I can't think of a safer place to store my spam. Safer than an NSA server.
dtxx
1 / 5 (2) Jul 20, 2013
should use services that don't go through American servers

Not really a solution, as with ultimate control over the DNS root server the NSA can just reroute any data they want via US servers.


Not true at all. Root DNS server does not mean root in the linux sense, or even that it has authority over sub domains. The type of change you are talking about being made would be both insanely obvious and intensely problematic. A program like PRISM is orchestrated at a deeper level, like core switch port mirroring as one method, and would never risk such a publicly visible move to gain intel.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Jul 20, 2013
The type of change you are talking about being made would be both insanely obvious and intensely problematic.

No one would notice. DNS injection at that level is completely undetectable.
VendicarE
5 / 5 (1) Jul 20, 2013
How much NSA code has found its way in CISCO servers?

The fact is, you just can't trust America.

America is the great Satan, the source of the greatest amount of evil and temptation in the world.

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