Underwater sensor successfully tested

Jun 05, 2013

As part of the Dutch STW SeaSTAR project researchers at the University of Twente have conducted tests using underwater communication and location finding at the Rutbeek water recreation park near Enschede. The aim of the SeaSTAR project is to develop wireless sensor network technology for underwater monitoring. These networks can be used for the underwater monitoring of leaks or movements in gas and oil pipelines or to understand marine life, for instance, or to check water quality or inspect ports and harbours. The latest tests show that precise location finding is now possible.

"UT has developed the communication platform as well as the system", explains UT scientist Wouter van Kleunen. "The experiments at Rutbeek are the first ones to be carried out using the platform on a large area of water. We need to test in a realistic environment with large distances between the sensors. Measurements were made using and sensor location finding. Rutbeek is a good testing site in a calm environment with recreational and scientific functions."

SeaSTAR project

The SeaSTAR project is a collaborative venture between a number of UT research groups (CAES, ICD and Pervasive Systems). Pervasive Systems is the project leader for the SeaSTAR project. The research focuses on the following areas: developing an energy-efficient acoustic underwater sensor, energy-efficient acoustic amplifiers for underwater communication, collaborative beam forming (receiving and transmitting directional signals), efficient network protocols, synchronization and location finding. All these technologies are needed for finely tuned, cost-effective underwater monitoring.


Explore further: Firm combines 3-D printing with ancient foundry method

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Finding undetonated bombs on the sea floor

Nov 13, 2012

(Phys.org)—CSIRO has developed a sensor to detect undetonated explosives on the sea floor. It is based on technology used to find mineral deposits underground.

New sensor detects bombs on sea floor

Nov 26, 2012

The CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) has developed a sensor to detect undetonated explosives on the sea floor. It is based on technology used to find mineral deposits underground.

NRL begins field tests of laser acoustic propagation

Jan 12, 2011

An NRL research team led by physicist, Dr. Ted Jones, Plasma Physics Division, performed the first successful long distance acoustic propagation and shock generation demonstration of their novel underwater ...

Photovoltaic cells tap underwater solar energy

Jun 07, 2012

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Electronics Science and Technology Division, dive into underwater photovoltaic research to develop high bandgap solar cells capable of producing sufficient ...

Recommended for you

Firm combines 3-D printing with ancient foundry method

Mar 27, 2015

A century-old firm that's done custom metal work for some of the nation's most prestigious buildings has combined 3-D printing and an ancient foundry process for a project at the National Archives Building in Washington, ...

Wearable device helps vision-impaired avoid collision

Mar 26, 2015

People who have lost some of their peripheral vision, such as those with retinitis pigmentosa, glaucoma, or brain injury that causes half visual field loss, often face mobility challenges and increased likelihood ...

Applications of optical fibre for sensors

Mar 26, 2015

Mikel Bravo-Acha's PhD thesis has focused on the applications of optical fibre as a sensor. In the course of his research, conducted at the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre, he monitored a sensor fitted to optical fibre ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.