NY Facebook plaintiff seeks halt to criminal case

May 10, 2013

(AP)—A New York man who was charged with fraud after filing a lawsuit claiming part ownership of Facebook wants a judge to stop the criminal case from moving forward.

Paul Ceglia of Wellsville said Friday he believes Facebook is behind the criminal charges. Menlo Park, Calif.-based Facebook declined to respond to the allegations.

in Manhattan charged Ceglia last fall, saying he tried to swindle and founder Mark Zuckerberg out of part of the company by doctoring a 2003 contract. That contract is the basis of Ceglia's 2010 civil suit.

Ceglia's lawyer, Joseph Alioto, asked a judge in Buffalo on Friday to suspend the until the civil action is over, arguing it's interfering with the suit. The judge reserved decision.

A magistrate judge's recommendation that the civil case should be dismissed is pending.

Explore further: NY judge leaves deadline in place in Facebook case

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