Digital public library with vast archive opens

Apr 18, 2013

(AP)—Some of the country's top research institutions have combined to launch a massive online archive.

The Digital Public Library of America began Thursday, promising a site with millions of materials ranging from images of George Washington to footage of Freedom Riders during the civil rights era. Directors of the digital library, first conceived in 2010, include officials from Harvard University and the University of Michigan and a former executive at .

The library had planned events at the Boston Public Library on Thursday to mark the opening, but it postponed them until the fall because of the bombings at the Boston Marathon.

Explore further: 'SwaziLeaks' looks to shake up jet-setting monarchy

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