High-res holograms from carbon nanotubes

Mar 27, 2013
Cover image of Advanced Optical Materials journal. Credit: Dr Haider Butt, Yunuen Montelongo, Tim Butler, Dr. Timothy D. Wilkinson and Professor Gehan A. J. Amaratunga

(Phys.org) —Researchers from the University of Cambridge's Department of Engineering have demonstrated the novel utilisation of carbon nanotubes for making high resolution holograms.

The research has been highlighted in several prestigious journals including Nature and also as the cover image of the journal Advanced Optical Materials.

Carbon nanotubes - a manmade material - have been the focus of an enormous amount of research during the last decade due to their extraordinary electrical and optical properties. These tubes are many times thinner than a wavelength of visible light which makes them promising candidates for being used as pixels.

"The size of pixels is one of the key limiting features in state-of-the-art holographic display systems," said researchers Dr Haider Butt, who conducted the work along with Yunuen Montelongo, both from the Centre of Molecular Materials for Photonics and Electronics (CMMPE) group at the Department of Engineering.

The researchers have produced holograms using the smallest pixels yet - carbon nanotubes. Due to the nanoscale dimensions of the array, the image presented a wide field of view and high resolution.

As reported in their article (published in the journal Advanced Optical Materials), the researchers first calculated the exact placement pattern for carbon nanotubes within the hologram that would produce a "CAMBRIDGE" image when illuminated by light. Based on calculations, the nanofabrication of a hologram consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes was performed on . The process was mostly performed by Tim Butler from the Department of Engineering's Electronics, Power and (EPEC) Research Group.

When the fabricated was illuminated by laser, very high contrast and wide field of view images of the word "CAMBRIDGE" were observed. This work is a breakthrough in the field of holographic technology as it reports the original use of nanostructures for producing holograms.

Explore further: Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

More information: "Optics: Nanotube holograms", S. Larouche and D. R. Smith, Nature 491, 47 (2012). www.nature.com/nature/journal/… 22/full/491047a.html

"Carbon nanotubes based high resolution holograms" Advanced Materials, 2012. onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10… a.201290286/abstract

Related Stories

Carbon nanotube forest camouflages 3-D objects

Nov 21, 2011

Carbon nanotubes, tiny cylinders composed of one-atom-thick carbon lattices, have gained fame as one of the strongest materials known to science. Now a group of researchers from the University of Michigan ...

Sandia researcher examines the physics of carbon nanotubes

May 01, 2008

Carbon nanotubes, described as the reigning celebrity of the advanced materials world, are all the rage. Recently researchers at Rice University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute used them to make the “blackest ...

Recommended for you

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Oct 29, 2014

A team led by the Lawrence Livermore scientists has created a new kind of ion channel based on short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores ...

An unlikely use for diamonds

Oct 27, 2014

Tiny diamonds are providing scientists with new possibilities for accurate measurements of processes inside living cells with potential to improve drug delivery and cancer therapeutics.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.