Materials science is an interdisciplinary field applying the properties of matter to various areas of science and engineering. This scientific field investigates the relationship between the structure of materials at atomic or molecular scales and their macroscopic properties. It incorporates elements of applied physics and chemistry. With significant media attention focused on nanoscience and nanotechnology in recent years, materials science has been propelled to the forefront at many universities. It is also an important part of forensic engineering and failure analysis. Materials science also deals with fundamental properties and characteristics of materials. The material of choice of a given era is often a defining point. Phrases such as Stone Age, Bronze Age, and Steel Age are good examples. Originally deriving from the manufacture of ceramics and its putative derivative metallurgy, materials science is one of the oldest forms of engineering and applied science. Modern materials science evolved directly from metallurgy, which itself evolved from mining and (likely) ceramics and the use of fire. A major breakthrough in the understanding of materials occurred in the late 19th

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons Wiley-VCH
Country
Germany
History
1989–present
Website
http://www.advmat.de
Impact factor
10.857 (2010)

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Collaboration sparks new model for ceramic conductivity

As insulators, metal oxides—also known as ceramics—may not seem like obvious candidates for electrical conductivity. While electrons zip back and forth in regular metals, their movement in ceramic materials is sluggish ...

Intelligent nanomaterials for photonics

Since the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for research on graphene in 2010, 2-D materials—nanosheets with atomic thickness—have been a hot topic in science. This significant interest is due to their outstanding properties, ...

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Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), a two-dimensional (2-D) semiconductor, are promising materials for next-generation optoelectronic devices. They can emit strong light due to the large binding energies of excitons, ...

Metal-ion breakthrough leads to new biomaterials

Metals such as iron and calcium play a crucial role inside the human body, so it's no surprise that bioengineers would like to integrate them into the soft, stretchy materials used to repair skin, blood vessels, lungs and ...

Colloidal quantum dot light emitters go broadband in the infrared

Broadband light emission in the infrared has proven to be of paramount importance for a large range of applications that include food quality and product/process monitoring, recycling, environmental sensing and monitoring, ...

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