Google patent suggests Google-Glass-ish control of appliances

Mar 24, 2013 by Nancy Owano report

(Phys.org)—Perceptions, design concepts, and expectations of Google Glass roll on, with yet another patent filing by Google. This time the call is for a Google Glass-like wearable computer to be the ultimate solution for remote controls. So far, the popular image of a Google Glass wearer is the enlightened, connected person on an enlightened urban avenue, smartly maneuvering data from the eyeglass device.

Act Two. Shift the Glass concept to indoors, in the living room, where Google Glass is a home-body's aid, used to control everyday objects, with the user issuing to the home devices and getting information from the objects as well.

That's what a new chapter in Google Glass might be. Earlier this week, Mat Smith of Engadget discovered the , Wearable Computer with Superimposed Controls and Instructions for External Device.

The patent was originally filed in September 2011 and recently published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. "During our patent application trawling this week, we fished up another possible application for Google's future-wear," wrote Smith.

The patent application called for a device for controlling home objects such as refrigerators, TVs, garage doors, and office machines.

One scenario would be for the wearable computer to relay instructions to open or close your garage door. Or, If the home printer were to be out of paper, the glasses would show an alert on the eyepiece and would tell you about adding paper in the correct tray.

Heads-up displays could show up on the glasses or on other objects, using built-in lasers. "When the wearable computing device determines that a target device is within its environment," according to the patent, "the wearable computing device obtains target device information related to the target device. The target device information may include information that defines a virtual control interface for controlling the target device and an identification of a defined area of the target device on which the virtual control image is to be provided."

The HMD, as suggested, may include an optical system mounted to a head- support. The optical system may include a light source, such as a light-emitting diode (LED) configured to illuminate something like a liquid crystal-on-silicon (LCOS) display panel. Also, the HMD may include a camera configured to capture images similar to the wearer's field of view.

The patent also described some technologies that could come into play such as RFID. "As another example, the wearable computing device may detect a beacon or other signal transmitted by the target device. The beacon or other signal could be, for example, a radio frequency signal, e.g., using WiFi, Bluetooth, or near field communication (NFC), an optical signal, such as an optical signal emitted by a visible or infrared LED on the target device, or an acoustic signal, such as an ultrasonic signal. In other examples, the device may detect a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag on the target device or recognize an optical identification, such as a barcode or quick response (QR) code on the target device."

Explore further: Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

Related Stories

Google Glass theft-protector is granted patent

Jul 19, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Google has been granted a patent for a crime-busting technique that would lock down and sound the alarm if anyone stole a Google Glass customer’s $1500 headset. The patent application suggested ...

Google patent sends ring signals to Project Glass

May 19, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Google's September 2011 patent that was filed for a wearable display device was granted this week, which suggests that its envisioned heads-up display device can be controlled by infrared markers ...

Google Glass may run with laser-projected keyboard

Jan 18, 2013

(Phys.org)—Just when you thought you could swing into 2013 without another report on Google Glass in-the-wings, this is the week your luck runs out. Ideas continue to fly regarding what could possibly be ...

Google has designs on flip-up wristwatch

Oct 04, 2012

(Phys.org)—While futurists have generally enthused about the coming age of wearable computing, showcase items among the top vendors have focused on prototypes for heads-up displays. Reactions have included ...

Apple bowl-headed patent shows wearable computing plans

Jul 29, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Like Google, Apple has plans to win recognition as wearable computing leaders. Patently Apple reports on a patent that was filed by Apple in January last year but made known earlier this week. ...

Google patent calls on eyes to unlock smart glasses

Aug 09, 2012

(Phys.org) -- In patent language, the application granted to Google this week says simply “Unlocking a screen using eye tracking information” but the message seems clear enough that Google plans ...

Recommended for you

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

Apr 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Neuroscientist's idea wins new-toy award

Apr 15, 2014

When he was a child, Robijanto Soetedjo used to play with his electrically powered toys for a while and then, when he got bored, take them apart - much to the consternation of his parents.

Land Rover demos invisible bonnet / car hood (w/ video)

Apr 14, 2014

(Phys.org) —Land Rover has released a video demonstrating a part of its Discover Vision Concept—the invisible "bonnet" or as it's known in the U.S. the "hood" of the car. It's a concept the automaker ...

Visions of 1964 World's Fair didn't all come true

Apr 12, 2014

Video phone calls? Yeah, we do that. Asking computers for information? Sure, several times a day. Colonies on the moon and jet packs as a mode of everyday transportation. OK, maybe not.

User comments : 19

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Arcbird
2.6 / 5 (5) Mar 24, 2013

"enlightened" hahaha.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (5) Mar 24, 2013
We need more enlightened illuminates. I mean illuminated by central Big Brother source. The first problem is, the Google glasses shouldn't be patented at all. This technology is notoriously known from various military applications and sci-fi movies for many years. Such a vendor locking will make the Google monopolist source of all informations submitted with Googles, which is pretty dangerous situation by itself.
Lurker2358
2 / 5 (8) Mar 24, 2013
Stephen Hawking has had this for years.

I really have no clue why those guys who made his communicator haven't done more with the tech.
ScooterG
2.5 / 5 (8) Mar 24, 2013
You couldn't run fast enough to give me a pair of these glasses. I want less gadgetry in my life, not more.
manifespo
not rated yet Mar 24, 2013
Smart and super functional furniture hold more appeal than Google's star trek glasses.
Anda
1 / 5 (1) Mar 24, 2013
Can do that with a device in my hand. Why should I ever want to put something in my eyes to do the same?
TheGhostofOtto1923
2 / 5 (4) Mar 24, 2013
1) Why would I ever need to control my refrigerator or my garage door with my glasses?
2) This would be of some use on a factory floor or in an office or a warehouse.
3) just think how distracted people will be when the interface is completely internal; when we are receiving and transmitting images and sound via the Internet directly to our brains. People will be walking zombies.

The internal dialogue - how soon before we can tap into it? How soon before you can hear what I am thinking?
Noumenon
2.6 / 5 (10) Mar 24, 2013
How soon before you can hear what I am thinking?

Probably not long before you're arrested, or start to hear screaming.

1) Why would I ever need to control my refrigerator or my garage door with my glasses?

I'm not sure how often one needs to control a refrigerator,... maybe to blast your drinks cold on your way home(?),.., as to garage doors,... why not? Most people press a button in their car to open them, whats the difference?

This would be of some use on a factory floor or in an office or a warehouse

There would be a lot of uses in general. I think a heads up display, if it can project a full display ahead of you, is simply a natural evolution of computer and internet tech.
Noumenon
2.6 / 5 (10) Mar 24, 2013
just think how distracted people will be when the interface is completely internal; when we are receiving and transmitting images and sound via the Internet directly to our brains. People will be walking zombies.


Maybe internet debates can finally become automated rather than just semi-automated. Those who let technology turn themselves into zombies only needed the TV, which has been around a long while,.... or beer, etc.
Stephen_Crowley
1.6 / 5 (7) Mar 24, 2013
What, has 'physics' become a whoring ground for google and capitalism now?
Noumenon
2.8 / 5 (11) Mar 24, 2013
What, has 'physics' become a whoring ground for google and capitalism now?


The catagory is "Technology: Hi- Tech and Innovation."
Mayday
5 / 5 (3) Mar 24, 2013
IMO, resistance is futile. These are really just the next logical step. Twenty years ago, few of us had any idea of the ultimate uses for the cell phone. Such technologies chew away at our privacy, that's true, but to-date there have been relatively few complaints. It is a bit disingenuous to complain about something that you can't live without, after all. I always said that Big Brother would never need to be forced upon us; we would happily pay to have it. And well, here he comes.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (2) Mar 24, 2013
This is just a consequence of our inquisitiveness. We want to know everything about other people, so we are forced to sacrifice our privacy.
TheGhostofOtto1923
2 / 5 (4) Mar 24, 2013
Probably not long before you're arrested, or start to hear screaming.
No seriously.
why not? Most people press a button in their car to open them, whats the difference?
Because most people press a button in their car to open them.
if it can project a full display ahead of you, is simply a natural evolution of computer and internet tech
Nothing natural about it.
http://www.youtub...AOYXT840
Maybe internet debates can finally become automated rather than just semi-automated
-so zephyr/jiggas sockpuppets could talk to each other? But they already do that.

Mayday
5 / 5 (2) Mar 24, 2013
It is just the latest answer to our desire for more convenience, instant knowledge and greater control. But now these things require real-time two-way interactions with far-flung databases. It can make life easier, even helping root out self-destructive lifestyle choices, helping us with everything from common obesity to climate change. But unfortunately, there will be those who will want our data for other purposes. Fortunately, with few exceptions, most of our behaviors are extremely predictable and in no way extraordinary. This access to everything happening everywhere in real-time will have advantages. And it will be abused. It can order take-out, save lives, find criminals, and root out enemies of the state. I would expect all of the above to happen. And sooner than you may imagine. I suspect the invention of the telescope was treated much the same way.
Telekinetic
3 / 5 (7) Mar 24, 2013
The world depicted in "THX1138" is starting to look like a cozy place to live.
axemaster
5 / 5 (1) Mar 25, 2013
Not to bash this tech, which I find quite interesting. But I expect that once this takes off, the hordes of people talking to their glasses are going to be EXTREMELY annoying. At least you don't have to give your cellphone verbal orders.

That said, I'm sure they'll come up with a better input method eventually, such as subvocalization.
Steven_Anderson
1 / 5 (1) Mar 25, 2013
I will be interested in the first case where the cops try to confiscate the glasses and beat up a pedestrian for wearing it! http://rawcell.com
Mayday
not rated yet Mar 25, 2013
I would buy them if the price is right -- in cellphone territory at the most. But I'm not too crazy about the clunky and dated 70s-ish scifi look of them. I hope they tap into a good product designer before too long. And wearing a transmitter up against my skull all day? Mmm, maybe not. And, I already wear glasses; so am I disqualified? Or do I have to go with their "one design fits all." Oh, and obviously you'll have to have a grilled cheese sized android phone in your pocket, right? Never mind.

More news stories

Sony's PlayStation 4 sales top seven million

Sony says it has sold seven million PlayStation 4 worldwide since its launch last year and admitted it can't make them fast enough, in a welcome change of fortune for the Japanese consumer electronics giant.

Robotics goes micro-scale

(Phys.org) —The development of light-driven 'micro-robots' that can autonomously investigate and manipulate the nano-scale environment in a microscope comes a step closer, thanks to new research from the ...

Biologists help solve fungi mysteries

(Phys.org) —A new genetic analysis revealing the previously unknown biodiversity and distribution of thousands of fungi in North America might also reveal a previously underappreciated contributor to climate ...