Wetland trees a significant overlooked source of methane, study finds

Feb 13, 2013

Wetlands are a well-established and prolific source of atmospheric methane. Yet despite an abundance of seething swamps and flooded forests in the tropics, ground-based measurements of methane have fallen well short of the quantities detected in tropical air by satellites.

In 2011, Sunitha Pangala, a PhD student at The Open University, who is co-supervised by University of Bristol researcher Dr Ed Hornibrook, spent several weeks in a forested peat swamp in Borneo with colleague Sam Moore, assessing whether soil methane might be escaping to the atmosphere by an alternative route.

Sunitha Pangala said: "Methane emissions normally are measured by putting sealed chambers on the ground to capture gas seeping or bubbling from the soil. We also enclosed tree stems in chambers and the results were surprising. About 80 per cent of all was venting through the trees."

The roots of trees, like all plants, need oxygen to survive. One strategy that trees use to cope in waterlogged soil is to enlarge , known as lenticels, in their stems to allow air to enter and diffuse to their roots. Pangala and colleagues have shown that these common adaptations in wetland trees are two-way conduits that also allow soil gas to escape to the atmosphere.

Dr Gauci said: "This work challenges current models of how forested wetlands exchange methane with the atmosphere. Ground-based estimates of methane flux in the tropics may be coming up short because tree emissions are never included in field campaigns."

The eight tree species investigated by the team are common in the tropics, including the vast . Establishing whether tree-mediated emissions of are ubiquitous in tropical wetlands is now the focus of a new three-year Natural Environment Research Council grant to Dr Gauci and Dr Hornibrook that begins later this year.

Explore further: US northeast braces for flooding after record snow

More information: 'Trees are major conduits for methane egress from tropical forested wetlands' by Pangala S.R., Moore S., Hornibrook E.R.C., and Gauci V. in New Phytologist.

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NotParker
3 / 5 (4) Feb 13, 2013
Global precipitation is up. Therefore wetlands should be up and therefore methane should be up.

However, AGW cult members will just blame it on humans.
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (2) Feb 13, 2013
Global precipitation is up

This is not true. In addition, global meteorological measurements suffer with bias, because in nature most of water evaporates back again. In dry atmosphere you can measure higher precipitation, yet the deserts and droughts will be spreading.

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