Scientists have discovered way to create high-quality graphene capacitor, which could deliver high-frequency electronics

Feb 13, 2013

(Phys.org)—Writing in PNAS, University of Manchester graphene researchers found that sandwiching a layer of the wonder material between boron nitride could produce highly-accurate capacitors.

Capacitors could pave the way for flexible and superstrong electronic devices.

Wonder material graphene was first isolated in 2004 at The University of Manchester by Professor Andre Geim and Professor Kostya Novoselov. Their work earned them the 2010 Nobel prize for Physics.

Graphene is the world's thinnest, strongest and most conductive material, and has the potential to revolutionise a huge number of diverse applications; from smartphones and ultrafast broadband to drug delivery and . Combining graphene with other materials, such as the ideal insulator , has been a particular area of success for the Manchester researchers – creating heterostructures which have unique properties.

Capacitors made this way could prove cheaper and easier to make than traditional transistors. The team used quantum capacitance spectroscopy to investigate the exceptional properties of , as this measurements shows better accuracy.

Explore further: Chemical vapor deposition used to grow atomic layer materials on top of each other

More information: Yu, G. et al. Interaction phenomena in graphene seen through quantum capacitance. PNAS.

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NikFromNYC
1 / 5 (3) Feb 13, 2013
No link to an abstract? Since BN is an insulator due to localized electrons whereas graphene is a conductor due to delocalization, and a capacitor needs a central insulator, doesn't this "sandwich" amount to one slice of bread with peanut butter on both sides?
El_Nose
5 / 5 (2) Feb 13, 2013

link to abstract

http://www.pnas.o...b9d9c16a

But it is just as vague as the article -- which is taking a lot of liberty if they are just going off the abstract as well.

--quote from abstract

Here, we use large-area high-quality graphene capacitors to study behavior of the density of states in this material in zero and high magnetic fields. Clear renormalization of the linear spectrum due to electron–electron interactions is observed in zero field. Quantizing fields lead to splitting of the spin- and valley-degenerate Landau levels into quartets separated by interaction-enhanced energy gaps. These many-body states exhibit negative compressibility but the compressibility returns to positive in ultrahigh B.

which describes the use of high quality graphene to study its capacitance capability. Not the other way around.

the TITLE IS A LIE -- no disambiguation -- its just wrong.
DavidW
1.8 / 5 (5) Feb 13, 2013
ty

link to abstract

http://www.pnas.o...b9d9c16a

But it is just as vague as the article -- which is taking a lot of liberty if they are just going off the abstract as well.

--quote from abstract

Here, we use large-area high-quality graphene capacitors to study behavior of the density of states in this material in zero and high magnetic fields. Clear renormalization of the linear spectrum due to electron–electron interactions is observed in zero field. Quantizing fields lead to splitting of the spin- and valley-degenerate Landau levels into quartets separated by interaction-enhanced energy gaps. These many-body states exhibit negative compressibility but the compressibility returns to positive in ultrahigh B.

which describes the use of high quality graphene to study its capacitance capability. Not the other way around.

the TITLE IS A LIE -- no disambiguation -- its just wrong.

StarGazer2011
2 / 5 (4) Feb 14, 2013
i think the problem is that most readers of physorg have a better science education than most writers of physorg. The writers are likely just your garden variety media/humanities graduate without much in the way of iq; they are doing their best just to copy paste press releases (which are written by simmialr media graduates without much in the way of iq)! The comments is where the action is i reckon.

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