Research busts myth that "Pakeha" is a derogatory term

Feb 05, 2013

The recurrent myth that the label "Pākehā" is derogatory is challenged by the latest findings from the large scale New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study. The study found generally positive feelings between Māori and New Zealanders of European descent, say researchers Dr Chris Sibley, Dr Carla Houkamau and Dr William Hoverd.

"We found no evidence whatsoever for the suggestion that the term 'Pākehā' is in any way pejorative or might reflect a toward New Zealanders of European descent," says Dr Sibley from The University of Auckland's School of Psychology. Dr Sibley leads the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study (NZAVS).

"Our findings indicate that the choice by Māori to use the term Pākehā is linked to how strongly they identify as Māori. The choice to use Te Reo is part of identity – rather than anything to do with Maori attitudes toward New Zealanders of European descent," says Dr Carla Houkamau of The University of Auckland Business School.

"Our data show that Māori who prefer the term Pākehā to other descriptions, such as 'New Zealand European', 'Kiwi', or 'New Zealander', tend to view their own ethnicity as a more central to their ," says Dr Sibley. "Māori also express very positive, warm attitudes toward New Zealanders of European descent generally, regardless of the label that they use to describe them."

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

"We think this is a really positive finding for New Zealand," adds Dr William Hoverd, a Research Associate in the School of Classics, Art History and at Victoria University of Wellington.

"The New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study provided the first opportunity to actually test this idea out in a nationally " says Dr Carla Houkamau. The study surveys the attitudes and beliefs of thousands of New Zealanders, and provided data on a wide range of questions from race relations to religious beliefs and .

New Zealanders of European descent also had generally warm attitudes towards Māori, but those who preferred to self-label as Pākehā expressed more positive views of Māori than those who chose other terms, such as "New Zealander" or "New Zealand European"

"Our findings suggest that Europeans who prefer to use the term Pākehā to describe themselves, are likely expressing a desire to recognise a positive relationship with Māori", says Dr Sibley. Europeans who prefer to use the term Pākehā were generally supportive of symbolic aspects of biculturalism the study showed.

The New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study, launched by Dr Sibley in 2009, surveys thousands of New Zealanders every year on a wide range of topics. The latest findings are derived from an analysis of two of the questions in the 2009 survey, about the terms people prefer to describe New Zealanders of European descent and their ratings of warmth toward themselves and members of other ethnic groups.

Use of the term Pākehā was relatively low overall (14%) and the most popular term was New Zealander (50%). Amongst Māori levels of support for the four main terms were: New Zealander 37%, Pākehā 31%, Kiwi 24%, and New Zealand European 19%. Amongst New Zealanders of European descent they were 53%, 12%, 17%, and 25% respectively. The findings were published in the journal Analyses of Social Issues and Public Policy.

A total of 6,518 people took part in the survey and their ethnicities were broadly representative of the New Zealand population, with 1,163 Māori participants and 4,618 New Zealanders of European descent.

Explore further: Study finds law dramatically curbing need for speed

More information: For more information about the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study visit the study website: www.psych.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/NZAVS

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Research examines the intersection of faith and crises

Dec 07, 2012

Social research that, by chance, was underway in New Zealand at the time of the devastating 2011 Christchurch earthquake is providing insight into age-old questions about the role of religious faith in a crisis.

Cultural games change attitudes

Jun 24, 2009

Persuasive technologies such as educational video games are more effective at changing people's attitudes or behaviours when they are adapted to a specific cultural audience.

Recommended for you

Study finds law dramatically curbing need for speed

Apr 18, 2014

Almost seven years have passed since Ontario's street-racing legislation hit the books and, according to one Western researcher, it has succeeded in putting the brakes on the number of convictions and, more importantly, injuries ...

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

Apr 17, 2014

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the ...

Can new understanding avert tragedy?

Apr 17, 2014

As a boy growing up in Syracuse, NY, Sol Hsiang ran an experiment for a school project testing whether plants grow better sprinkled with water vs orange juice. Today, 20 years later, he applies complex statistical ...

Creative activities outside work can improve job performance

Apr 16, 2014

Employees who pursue creative activities outside of work may find that these activities boost their performance on the job, according to a new study by San Francisco State University organizational psychologist Kevin Eschleman ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...

Ex-Apple chief plans mobile phone for India

Former Apple chief executive John Sculley, whose marketing skills helped bring the personal computer to desktops worldwide, says he plans to launch a mobile phone in India to exploit its still largely untapped ...

Filipino tests negative for Middle East virus

A Filipino nurse who tested positive for the Middle East virus has been found free of infection in a subsequent examination after he returned home, Philippine health officials said Saturday.

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.