Curiosity rover collects first Martian bedrock sample

Feb 09, 2013
At the center of this image from NASA's Curiosity rover is the hole in a rock called "John Klein" where the rover conducted its first sample drilling on Mars. The drilling took place on Feb. 8, 2013, or Sol 182, Curiosity's 182nd Martian day of operations. Several preparatory activities with the drill preceded this operation, including a test that produced the shallower hole on the right two days earlier, but the deeper hole resulted from the first use of the drill for rock sample collection. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

(Phys.org)—NASA's Curiosity rover has, for the first time, used a drill carried at the end of its robotic arm to bore into a flat, veiny rock on Mars and collect a sample from its interior. This is the first time any robot has drilled into a rock to collect a sample on Mars.

The fresh hole, about 0.63 inch (1.6 centimeters) wide and 2.5 inches (6.4 centimeters) deep in a patch of fine-grained sedimentary , can be seen in images and other data beamed to Earth Saturday. The is believed to hold evidence about long-gone wet environments. In pursuit of that evidence, the rover will use its laboratory instruments to analyze rock powder collected by the drill.

"The most advanced planetary robot ever designed is now a fully operating analytical laboratory on Mars," said John Grunsfeld, associate administrator for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. "This is the biggest accomplishment for the Curiosity team since the sky-crane landing last August, another proud day for America."

For the next several days, ground controllers will command the rover's arm to carry out a series of steps to process the sample, ultimately delivering portions to the instruments inside.

An animated set of three images from NASA's Curiosity rover shows the rover's drill in action on Feb. 8, 2013, or Sol 182, Curiosity's 182nd Martian day of operations. This was the first use of the drill for rock sample collection. The target was a rock called "John Klein," in the Yellowknife Bay region of Gale Crater on Mars. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

"We commanded the first full-depth drilling, and we believe we have collected sufficient material from the rock to meet our objectives of hardware cleaning and sample drop-off," said Avi Okon, drill cognizant engineer at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

Rock powder generated during drilling travels up flutes on the bit. The bit assembly has chambers to hold the powder until it can be transferred to the sample-handling mechanisms of the rover's Collection and Handling for In-Situ Analysis (CHIMRA) device.

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity used its Mast Camera (Mastcam) to take the images combined into this mosaic of the drill area, called "John Klein." The label "Drill" indicates where the rover ultimately performed its first sample drilling. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Before the rock powder is analyzed, some will be used to scour traces of material that may have been deposited onto the hardware while the rover was still on Earth, despite thorough cleaning before launch.

"We'll take the powder we acquired and swish it around to scrub the internal surfaces of the drill bit assembly," said JPL's Scott McCloskey, drill systems engineer. "Then we'll use the arm to transfer the powder out of the drill into the scoop, which will be our first chance to see the acquired sample."

"Building a tool to interact forcefully with unpredictable rocks on Mars required an ambitious development and testing program," said JPL's Louise Jandura, chief engineer for Curiosity's sample system. "To get to the point of making this hole in a rock on Mars, we made eight drills and bored more than 1,200 holes in 20 types of rock on Earth."

Inside the sample-handling device, the powder will be vibrated once or twice over a sieve that screens out any particles larger than six-thousandths of an inch (150 microns) across. Small portions of the sieved sample will fall through ports on the rover deck into the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument. These instruments then will begin the much-anticipated detailed analysis.

The rock Curiosity drilled is called "John Klein" in memory of a Mars Science Laboratory deputy project manager who died in 2011. Drilling for a is the last new activity for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory Project, which is using the car-size to investigate whether an area within ' Gale Crater has ever offered an environment favorable for life.

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User comments : 13

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VendicarE
5 / 5 (1) Feb 09, 2013
More interesting...

http://mars.jpl.n...DXXX.jpg

Top middle of image.
Sinister1811
2.1 / 5 (7) Feb 10, 2013
More interesting...

http://mars.jpl.n...DXXX.jpg

Top middle of image.


That's very unusual. I wonder what that is. It looks as though it could be metallic.
VendicarE
5 / 5 (2) Feb 10, 2013
It is too far away to be from the rover itself.

Strongly deserving of investigation.

Stoney Iron Meteorite?
Sinister1811
1.8 / 5 (5) Feb 10, 2013
It could be. But it's an usual shape. It almost appears to be sticking out of the rock underneath. I wonder what NASA would make of it.
VendicarE
5 / 5 (3) Feb 10, 2013
I'm thinking that it is a metal/mineral inclusion in a rock/clay that has been exposed as the surrounding rock/clay has been weathered and sand blasted away.

More pictures are required.
Surcharger
3.3 / 5 (7) Feb 10, 2013
That's obviously a weather balloon, move along!
ValeriaT
1 / 5 (1) Feb 10, 2013
Apparently no iron oxides are presented bellow surface - the rock is of pure grey color like the concrete. It seems, most of typical Mars color comes from meteorites. It's just the presence of atmosphere, what makes the Mars visually different from Moon.
szore88
1.7 / 5 (6) Feb 10, 2013
Photoshop.
Shootist
2.3 / 5 (3) Feb 10, 2013
Apparently no iron oxides are presented bellow surface - the rock is of pure grey color like the concrete. It seems, most of typical Mars color comes from meteorites. It's just the presence of atmosphere, what makes the Mars visually different from Moon.


As the crust is completely brecciated to the mantle, and the surface covered with rock dredged up from 10s of kilometers in depth, I doubt you can tell a "meteorite" from a Mars' rock.

And This Bloody Well Isn't Bedrock. It is the floor of an impact crater which has been filled with material, post impact. God Dam but when will physorg get some qualified editors?
aaron1960
1 / 5 (2) Feb 10, 2013
looks like a martian rabbit to me
baudrunner
2 / 5 (3) Feb 10, 2013
So that's what happened to the hot water handle from my bathroom faucet.
GSwift7
4 / 5 (4) Feb 11, 2013
Shootist:

And This Bloody Well Isn't Bedrock. It is the floor of an impact crater which has been filled with material, post impact. God Dam but when will physorg get some qualified editors?


You need to do a little bit more reading. The crater is very ancient. It seems to have been filled in after it was created, probably completely filled in with sediment. Since then, it has been weathered back out, exposing bedrock below what was once the bottom of the crater. Mount Sharpe is all that remains of the sediment that once filled the crater. The rock which Curiosity is currently drilling actually is bedrock; older than the crater itself.

At least read the wiki page before polluting the thread with wrong information.
Shootist
1 / 5 (2) Feb 14, 2013
1), bedrock is a specific term in geology.
bed·rock
/ˈbedˌräk/
Noun
Solid rock underlying loose deposits such as soil or alluvium.

You can look at the released photos and see there is no solid rock. Breccia everywhere.

2), You are completely incorrect to assume there is "bedrock" in the floor of an impact crater. Here is a primer on cratering.

http://www.lpi.us...-954.pdf

Aeolis Mons is uplifted bedrock, yes. But the transient crater was ~25km deep, filled with unconsolidated breccia, then loess, then erosion back to the unconsolidated breccia.

There is no bedrock to be studied in the floor of Gale crater. It is kilometers deep.

Looking around at other "news" reports, including the release from NASA. Physorg is the only one that refers to "bedrock". Thankfully, some are not as ignorant as others.