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AAFP releases updated Feline Zoonoses Guidelines

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) today released updated Feline Zoonoses Guidelines to the veterinary community. These are published Online First, and will appear in the November issue of the Journal ...

Embattled Noble Group completes $3.5 bn overhaul

Embattled commodities trader Noble Group has completed a $3.5 billion restructuring, it said Thursday, as the firm seeks to draw a line under a long-running crisis that pushed it to the brink of bankruptcy.

Researchers capture 'key' to deadly malaria infection

An international team led by Institute researchers has visualised the unique molecular 'key' used by the world's deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, to enter and infect human blood cells.

Olympic broadcasters gear up for the biggest show on earth

Clock-watching is an integral part of any Olympic Games but even the most eagle-eyed sporting anoraks might be forgiven for missing the fact that Sunday marks 600 days until the start of the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

Facebook hits two billion user mark

Facebook said Tuesday its ranks of monthly active users had hit the two billion mark—meaning more than a quarter of the world's population is on the giant social network.

Britain could see its first full day without coal

Britain's National Grid says Friday may be the first full 24-hour work-day since the Industrial Revolution in which the nation doesn't depend on electricity generated from coal.

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Milestone

A milestone is one of a series of numbered markers placed along a road or boundary at intervals of one mile or occasionally, parts of a mile. They are typically located at the side of the road or in a median. They are alternatively known as mile markers, mileposts or mile posts (sometimes abbreviated MPs). Mileage is the distance along the road from a fixed commencement point.

Milestones are constructed to provide reference points along the road. This can be used to reassure travellers that the proper path is being followed, and to indicate either distance travelled or the remaining distance to a destination. Such references are also used to by maintenance engineers and emergency services to direct them to specific points where their presence is required. This term is sometimes used to denote a location on a road even if no physical sign is present. This is useful for accident reporting and other record keeping (e.g., "an accident occurred at the 13 mile mark" even if the road is only marked with a stone once every 10 miles).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA