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Water in bedrock is sustaining trees across country

You can't squeeze water from a rock. But tree roots can—and they're doing it more frequently than scientists previously thought, with a new study finding that bedrock is a regular source of water for trees across the United ...

New, active viruses found at depths of over 400 meters

Researchers who investigated water-filled cracks in the bedrock at a depth of 448 meters outside Oskarshamn in Sweden have found completely new viruses and vibrant bacterial and viral communities. The findings show that viruses ...

A new method for dating ancient earthquakes

Constraining the history of earthquakes produced by bedrock fracturing is important for predicting seismic activity and plate tectonic evolution. In a new study published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports Jan 17, 2020, ...

Hard as a rock? Maybe not, say bacteria that help form soil

Research published this week by University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists shows how bacteria can degrade solid bedrock, jump-starting a long process of alteration that creates the mineral portion of soil.

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Bedrock

In stratigraphy, bedrock is the native consolidated rock underlying the surface of a terrestrial planet, usually the Earth. Above the bedrock is usually an area of broken and weathered unconsolidated rock in the basal subsoil. The top of the bedrock is known as rockhead and identifying this, via excavations, drilling or geophysical methods, is an important task in most civil engineering projects. Superficial deposits (also known as drift) can be extremely thick, such that the bedrock lies hundreds of metres below the surface.

Bedrock may also experience subsurface weathering at its upper boundary, forming saprolite.

A solid geologic map of an area will usually show the distribution of differing rock types; i.e., rock that would be exposed at the surface if all soil or other superficial deposits were removed.

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