Sweden's Gothenburg to introduce tolls to cut traffic

Dec 30, 2012
A car passes a congestion tax control point in Stockholm on May 12, 2006. Sweden's second city Gothenburg will introduce a road toll on January 1 for all motorists entering or leaving the city, similar to one already in place in Stockholm.

Sweden's second city Gothenburg will introduce a road toll on January 1 for all motorists entering or leaving the city, similar to one already in place in the capital Stockholm.

The system, aimed at financing infrastructure investments, reducing and cutting traffic in Gothenburg's centre by around 15 percent, will include some 40 toll stations around the city.

A similar system introduced in Stockholm in 2007 has led to a 15-18 percent reduction of traffic in the city centre, Eva Rosman of the Swedish Transport Agency told news agency TT on Sunday.

Gothenburg, located on Sweden's west coast, has some 520,000 inhabitants.

Motorists entering and leaving the city Monday to Friday will pay between eight and 18 kronor ($1.2 to $2.75, 0.93 to 2.10 euros), depending on the time of day, with an upper limit of 60 kronor a day.

The charge is to be paid between the hours of 6:00 am and 6:29 pm. The holiday month of July will be free, as are evenings and weekends. Cars with foreign and emergency vehicles will be exempt.

Overhead cameras will register the licence plates of cars entering or leaving city limits. Motorists can either have the amount automatically deducted from their bank account or pay a bill in some shops or by Internet.

who don't pay will be fined 500 kronor.

Gothenburg's city council approved the congestion charge in a vote in 2010, and it was later approved by the Swedish parliament.

But many residents are opposed to the toll, and some 45,000 people have signed a petition calling for a referendum to be held on the issue.

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Lurker2358
1.5 / 5 (2) Dec 30, 2012
A similar system introduced in Stockholm in 2007 has led to a 15-18 percent reduction of traffic in the city centre, Eva Rosman of the Swedish Transport Agency told news agency TT on Sunday.


It's not about the pollution, it's about the money. The 15 to 18% just went to another city to do whatever they wanted to do, which means you haven't offset anything in pollution.

The fact they don't charge the toll to foreigners shows that they are hoping for making it up in sales taxes on goods inside the city.

So the government punishes it's own citizens in a way that hasn't a chance in hell of reducing pollution, but doesn't punish foreigners because they're making enough other tax incomes from them.

People should petition. This is a rip-off.

Wow. A tax to enter the city AND a tax to leave the city...

I wonder what they do for trucking companies and taxis, especially dedicated route drivers who may make several round trips per day...
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (3) Dec 30, 2012
The 15 to 18% just went to another city to do whatever they wanted to do

Nope - they took the train. Sweden has a very good train system and people use it readily.

Example: In Östergötland - which is a province directly south of the one where Stockholm is located rail use is at an all time high with almost 4200km per person per year.
http://www.railwa...outheast

(couldn't find one for the provinces of Uppland and Södermanland where Stockholm is located. But I have ridden the trains there myself and it's a very good way of getting around - especially since you don't have to worry about road conditions which can be pretty harsh up there during the winter)

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