Japanese researchers build robot with most humanlike muscle-skeleton structure yet (w/ video)

Dec 12, 2012 by Bob Yirka weblog

(Phys.org)—Researchers at the University of Tokyo have taken another step towards creating a robot with a faithfully recreated human skeleton and muscle structure. Called Kenshiro, the robot has been demonstrated at the recent Humanoids 2012 conference in Osaka, Japan.

Kenshiro is the next step for the researchers. Their previous effort resulted in a robot they called Kojiro – a robot that demonstrated the huge strides that have come in mimicking the human body, as well as the very long road yet to travel. In this new iteration, Kenshiro was preceded by a robot concept the team called Kenzoh. In that effort the team found that simply adding and bones generally tended to create weight problems. The upper body alone came to 45 kg. That caused the team to go back to the , this time with the idea of mimicking human bone and muscle at the individual body part level, i.e. a backbone, calf, or knee joint. Each part was custom designed to fall within the weight parameters of actual human limbs and other parts of the body.

This video is not supported by your browser at this time.

The result is a robot sized to approximate the average 12 year old Japanese boy – with bones made of aluminum that have been connected together in a way that very closely resembles the way are connected, e.g. artificial ligaments, etc., and a collection of muscles that mimic very closely those in the human body as well. Kenshiro has 160 muscles that are constructed using a single actuator motor for individual with each consisting of a system of wires and moving pulleys. "He" stands 158 centimeters tall and weighs 50 kilograms and at this time has more muscles than any other robot.

Though Kinshiro is a single individual robot, in action, it appears to be a collection of parts cobbled together to form a single whole. The robot can walk, but just barely. It can do deep knee bends, but the rest of the body seems out of sync. Thus, this new robot is clearly more of a research project than an attempt to build a robot that moves around like a real human being. It does very clearly demonstrate however, where the research is headed and what the ultimate goal is: nothing short of a robot that mimics the human body down to the very smallest details and moves in exactly the same ways.

Explore further: Robots recognize humans in disaster environments

More information: via IEEE

Related Stories

HRP-4C female robot has a new walk (w/ video)

Nov 13, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Japan's entertaining robot that sings and looks like a beautiful young female is finally learning how to walk just like a beautiful girl—well, almost. Robotics developers at the National ...

Kondo Robot releases a hexapod robot kit (w/ video)

Apr 11, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Kondo Robot, a Japan-based robotics company known for selling robotics kits which often end up in robot-on-robot battles, announced the release of a new robot kit. The kit, named the KMR-M6 ...

Recommended for you

Microsoft beefs up security protection in Windows 10

10 hours ago

What Microsoft users in business care deeply about—-a system architecture that supports efforts to get their work done efficiently; a work-centric menu to quickly access projects rather than weather readings ...

US official: Auto safety agency under review

23 hours ago

Transportation officials are reviewing the "safety culture" of the U.S. agency that oversees auto recalls, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been criticized ...

Out-of-patience investors sell off Amazon

23 hours ago

Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' invest-and-expand ...

Ebola.com domain sold for big payout

23 hours ago

The owners of the website Ebola.com have scored a big payday with the outbreak of the epidemic, selling the domain for more than $200,000 in cash and stock.

Hacker gets prison for cyberattack stealing $9.4M

Oct 24, 2014

An Estonian man who pleaded guilty to orchestrating a 2008 cyberattack on a credit card processing company that enabled hackers to steal $9.4 million has been sentenced to 11 years in prison by a federal judge in Atlanta.

Magic Leap moves beyond older lines of VR

Oct 24, 2014

Two messages from Magic Leap: Most of us know that a world with dragons and unicorns, elves and fairies is just a better world. The other message: Technology can be mindboggingly awesome. When the two ...

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Tri-ring
4.3 / 5 (6) Dec 12, 2012
If you put synthetic skin and a head I believe we have ourselves a T-800 prototype.
NotAsleep
4.8 / 5 (5) Dec 12, 2012
A T-800 prototype that couldn't navigate the simplest of obstacles to chase you and couldn't travel any further than the length of it's power cord...
CapitalismPrevails
2.5 / 5 (6) Dec 12, 2012
iRobot? NS-5?
Expiorer
1 / 5 (2) Dec 13, 2012
Movements is what matters.
That robot moves like a broken drill.

If you make a robot that runs on uneven surface then I will say that machine looks smart (or dangerous).