Newsweek ending print edition, job cuts expected

October 18, 2012

(AP)—Newsweek plans to end its print publication after 80 years and will shift to an online-only format starting in early 2013. Job cuts are expected.

Newsweek's last U.S. print edition will be its Dec. 31 issue.

Barry Diller, the head of the company that owns Newsweek, had announced in July that the publication was examining its future as a weekly magazine.

The announcement of the change was made by Tina Brown, editor-in-chief and founder of The Newsweek Daily Beast Co., on The Daily Beast website Thursday.

Brown said staff cuts are expected, but didn't give a specific figure.

Brown said that the online publication will be called Global and will be a single, worldwide edition that requires a paid subscription. It will be available for tablets and online reading, with certain content available on The Daily Beast website.

Explore further: Washington Post puts Newsweek up for sale

0 shares

Related Stories

Audio pioneer Sidney Harman dead at 92

April 13, 2011

Audio pioneer Sidney Harman, who bought Newsweek magazine last year and merged it with The Daily Beast website, died on Tuesday. He was 92.

Newsweek likely to become digital magazine

July 25, 2012

The company operating the US magazine Newsweek indicated Wednesday the venerable publication is likely to go digital to stem its losses and could undergo other changes by next year.

Recommended for you

Snapchat introduces video-catching sunglasses

September 24, 2016

Vanishing message service Snapchat announced Saturday it will launch a line of video-catching sunglasses, a spin on Glass eyewear abandoned by Google more than a year ago.

First test of driverless minibus in Paris Saturday

September 24, 2016

The French capital's transport authority will on Saturday carry out its first test of a driverless minibus, in the hope that regular routes for the hi-tech vehicles will be up and running within two years.

Hyperloop pushes dream of low-cost futuristic transport

September 23, 2016

Is it a plane, is it a train? No, say supporters of Hyperloop, a futuristic mode of transport floated by Silicon Valley billionaire Elon Musk that promises high-tech, high-speed and cheap travel over long distances.

US moves to regulate self-driving cars

September 20, 2016

The United States unveiled a sweeping new regulatory framework for the unexpectedly rapid rise of self-driving automobile technology, just days after Uber broke ground with its first driverless taxis.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.