NASA sees heaviest rainfall near Typhoon Prapiroon's center

Oct 12, 2012
When NASA's TRMM satellite passed over Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 12 at 0741 UTC (3:41 a.m. EDT), light to moderate rainfall (blue and green) was occurring over most of the storm at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. There was a small area of heavy rainfall (red) just south of the center where rain was falling at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour. Credit: Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

NASA measured light-to-moderate rainfall occurring throughout Typhoon Prapiroon, with just a small area of heavy rain near the storm's center is it tracks through the western North Pacific Ocean.

When NASA's Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed over Typhoon Prapiroon on Oct. 12 at 0741 UTC (3:41 a.m. EDT), the instrument detected light to moderate rainfall occurring over most of the storm at a rate between .78 to 1.57 inches/20 to 40 mm per hour. The northwestern quadrant of the storm had the lightest rainfall rate.

There was a small area of heavy rainfall just south of the ragged eye where rain was falling at 2 inches (50 mm) per hour. TRMM also noticed that the highest thunderstorms were almost 12 kilometers (7.4 miles) high in that same region of heavy rain.

In addition to dropping a lot of rain, Typhoon Prapiroon is churning up the seas around it. The Joint noted that waves are as high as 41 feet (12.5 meters) in the vicinity of the storm.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Oct. 11, Typhoon Prapiroon's were near 90 knots (103 mph/166.7 kph). It was located near 20.3 North latitude and 129.4 East longitude, about 370 nautical miles (425.8 miles/685.2 km) south of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Prapiroon is moving to the east-northeast at 4 knots (4.6 mph/7.4 kph) and is expected to continue moving over open ocean and in that general direction over the next couple of days.

Explore further: The Albian Gap, salt rock, and a heated debate

Related Stories

NASA eyes Typhoon Prapiroon intensifying

Oct 09, 2012

Typhoon Prapiroon is the twenty-second tropical cyclone of the western North Pacific Ocean, making for a very active season. NASA's Terra satellite passed over the storm as it was intensifying into a typhoon ...

NASA eyes Typhoon Prapiroon's U-turn

Oct 10, 2012

Typhoon Prapiroon is making a U-turn in the Philippine Sea, changing direction from northwest to northeast. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of the typhoon as it began turning. Visible satellite imagery ...

Recommended for you

The Albian Gap, salt rock, and a heated debate

3 hours ago

Salt rock behaves as a fluid and can play a pivotal role in the large-scale, long-term collapse of the world's continental margins. However, the precise way in which this occurs is laced in controversy; nowhere ...

Satellites catch the birth of two volcanic islands

13 hours ago

The birth of a volcanic island is a potent and beautiful reminder of our dynamic planet's ability to make new land. Given the destruction we've seen following natural events like earthquakes and tsunamis in t ...

Uncovering diversity in an invisible ocean world

14 hours ago

Plankton are vital to life on Earth—they absorb carbon dioxide, generate nearly half of the oxygen we breathe, break down waste, and are a cornerstone of the marine food chain. Now, new research indicates ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.