Dyson engineers labor toward hair-free turbine solution (w/ Video)

Oct 12, 2012 by Nancy Owano report
Credit: Dyson

(Phys.org)—At such an innovation rich time of telepresence, 3-D printing, advanced cryptography, advanced medical imaging, and robotics, you need to wonder why in all this time we never got a break with someone somewhere coming up with a hair-clog solution for vacuum cleaners. Better late than never. Dyson has a tool that avoids the problem of having to scrape off and cut away at hair around the brush bars. Called the Dyson Tangle-Free Turbine the problem solver is listed at $69.99 and is promoted as a tool to reduce hair entanglements that occur during vacuum cleaning.

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The designers took a second look at traditional brushes at the bottom of vacuums. They noticed the way the tools too easily ball up fibers on carpets and upholstery. They wanted something other than a single spinning cylinder. Instead of a horizontal spinning brush, Dyson's accessory uses a more vertical axis of movement. The device features two flexible counter-rotating heads with built-in brushes that prevent -clogging and send hair into the vacuum bin. These two counter-rotating discs spin like floor buffers, and that is key to the solution. Also, the designers noted how brush bars of conventional turbine tools are rigid and lose contact with uneven surfaces. The brushes on the new Dyson tool are flexible and can bend to maintain contact across uneven surfaces. The design is such that the brushes reach to the front and side of the tool, drawing in hair and dirt from all directions.

Dyson engineers labor toward hair-free turbine solution (w/ Video)
Credit: Dyson

The simple answer to hair clogs in vacuum cleaning process, evidently, is not so simple, at least when it comes to the Dyson brand of engineering with a difference.

Dyson engineers labor toward hair-free turbine solution (w/ Video)
Credit: Dyson

According to reports, the tool debut is a result of more than 50 engineers, 187 , and four years of work.

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User comments : 7

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grondilu
5 / 5 (2) Oct 12, 2012
As I was wondering if this could have any *serious* application, I thought about a BBC Horizon program where they talked about goats milking spider silk proteins. The silk extraction part was a bit tedious as a machine was slowly rolling a single fiber around a cylinder. Who knows, maybe this brush could be used to brush a whole bunch of messed-up spider silk.
Code_Warrior
not rated yet Oct 13, 2012
I think it's pretty cool.
VendicarD
5 / 5 (1) Oct 13, 2012
Transforming Mankind, one suck at a time.
baudrunner
1 / 5 (1) Oct 13, 2012
Transforming Mankind, one suck at a time.
After 187 prototypes that sucked.
Fakeer
not rated yet Oct 15, 2012
The hair laden roller problem is most prevalent while vacuuming carpets. This new attachment seems impractical for such large areas. Possibly intended for pet hair on couches etc.
33Nick
not rated yet Oct 15, 2012
Check out Rexair.com. I think Dyson does a great job but it's akin to making a fire in a fireplace using batteries. With enough energy, anything can happen. Rexair took another more intelligent route, using water to filter and a brushless, CPU controlled electric motor. Using water to filter is as old as time itself and works without a hitch... and yes, it's expensive but you pay for what you get.
greg_woulf
not rated yet Oct 28, 2012
Check out Rexair.com. I think Dyson does a great job but it's akin to making a fire in a fireplace using batteries. With enough energy, anything can happen. Rexair took another more intelligent route, using water to filter and a brushless, CPU controlled electric motor. Using water to filter is as old as time itself and works without a hitch... and yes, it's expensive but you pay for what you get.


There's no way that adding water and a CPU is more intelligent than engineering a mechanical solution. The cost to produce Dysons solution is next to nothing, the risk of failure is a fraction and the convenience to the consumer is also on the Dyson side.

This is a simple and elegant solution that's cheap and easy to produce. If it works I don't see any way to fault it.