Tropical Depression Khanun blankets South Korea

July 19, 2012
This true-color image of Tropical Depression Khanun over South Korea was captured by the MODIS instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite at 0225 UTC, July 19, 2012. Credit: Credit: NASA MODIS Rapid Response Team

Tropical Depression Khanun came ashore with some heavy rainfall in the morning hours (local time) on Thursday, July 19. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Khanun's clouds on July 19, covering all of South Korea like a blanket.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument onboard NASA's captured a true-color image of Khanun over South Korea on July 19, 2012 at 0225 UTC, or 11:25 a.m. local time, Seoul (10:25 p.m. EDT/U.S. on July 18).

The last advisory on Khanun from the Joint was issued at 0300 UTC (noon local time, Seoul, South Korea) on July 19, when the center was already over land. At that time, Khanun was centered about 15 miles south of Seoul, South Korea, near 37.2 North and 127.1 East. It was moving to the north-northeast at 16 knots (18.4 mph/29.6 kmh) and had near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph), but was quickly weakening due to its interaction with land.

Khanun caused flooding and power outages, and affected major transportation systems, according to the Korea Herald. One fatality was reported in the North Gyeongsang Province when the wall of a home collapsed. Warnings were dropped in the early afternoon as Khanun continued to weaken and move inland.

Jeju Island, which felt the effects of Khanun first as it approached from the south and the South Jeolla Province both experienced heavy rainfall and power outages from the storm, according to the Korea Herald. The Korean Meteorological Administration reported that 2.1 inches (53.4 millimeters) or rain fell in Jeju, while as much as 3.8 (97 millimeters) fell on Suncheon, located in the South Jeolla Province.

The Korean Meteorological Administration noted that the center of Khanun's remnants had moved over the by 11 a.m. EDT on July 19, 2012.

Explore further: NASA sees Tropical Depression Meari about to cross North Vietnam

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