'God particle' a gateway to new vision of universe

Jul 05, 2012 by Amy Coopes
A graphic from the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva shows a proton-proton collision event measured in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experience in the search for the Higgs boson. Physicists said Thursday the potential discovery of the "God particle" was a gateway to a new era that could see humanity unlock some of the universe's great mysteries including dark matter.

Physicists said Thursday the potential discovery of the "God particle" was a gateway to a new era that could see humanity unlock some of the universe's great mysteries including dark matter.

The European Organisation for (CERN) unveiled data from the on Wednesday "consistent with the long-sought Higgs boson", an thought to help explain why matter has mass.

It was hailed as a huge moment for science by physicists gathered in Australia, where CERN's findings were unveiled via videolink from Geneva at a landmark conference attended by hundreds of the field's top experts.

Scientists went into a frenzy following the announcement, speculating that it could one day make travel possible by "un-massing" objects or allow huge items to be launched into space by "switching off" the Higgs.

CERN scientist Albert de Roeck likened it to the discovery of electricity, when he said humanity could never have imagined its future applications.

"What's really important for the Higgs is that it explains how the world could be the way that it is in the first millionth of a second in the Big Bang," de Roeck told AFP.

"Can we apply it to something? At this moment my imagination is too small to do that."

Physicist Ray Volkas said "almost everybody" was hoping that, rather than fitting the so-called Standard Model of physics -- a theory explaining how particles fit together in the Universe -- the would prove to be "something a bit different".

"If that was the case that would point to all sorts of new physics, physics that might have something to do with dark matter," he said, referring to the hypothetical invisible matter thought to make up much of the universe.

British physicist Peter Higgs smiles at a press conference on July 4, at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) offices in Meyrin near Geneva. After a quest spanning nearly half a century, physicists said on July 4 they had found a new sub-atomic particle consistent with the Higgs boson which is believed to confer mass.

"It could be, for example, that the acts as a bridge between ordinary matter, which makes up atoms, and dark matter, which we know is a very important component of the universe."

"That would have really fantastic implications for understanding all of the matter in the universe, not just ordinary atoms," he added.

De Roeck said scrutinising the new particle and determining whether it supported something other than the Standard Model would be the next step for CERN scientists.

Clarification could be expected by the beginning of 2013; definitive proof that it fitted the Standard Model could take until 2015 when the LHC had more power and could harvest more data.

The LHC is due to go offline for a two-year refit in December that will see its firepower doubled to 14 trillion electronvolts -- a huge step forward in the search for new particles and clues about what holds them all together.

De Roeck said he would find it a "little boring at the end if it turns out that this is just the Higgs".

Instead, he was hoping it would be a "gateway or a portal to , to new theories which are actually running nature" such as supersymmetry, which hypothesises that there are five different Higgs particles governing mass.

The hunt for Higgs -- the logical next step of which de Roeck said would be searching for, and eventually being able to produce, particles -- has already had huge benefits to medicine and technology.

Volkas said the Internet was born at as a solution to high-volume data-sharing and other major spin-offs were likely to follow as physicists continued to "push the boundaries of pure science".

Participants take a rest early on July 4, before the opening of a seminar on the latest update in the 50-year search for the Higgs boson pareticle at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) near Geneva. Physicists said Thursday the potential discovery of the "God particle" was a gateway to a new era that could see humanity unlock some of the universe's great mysteries

"We just want to know how the world works, but in order to answer those questions you have to develop new technologies," he said.

Funding for particle physics is already under scrutiny in North America, where the LHC's predecessor, the Illinois-based Tevatron run by Fermilab, was closed late last year due to financial constraints.

Fermilab director Pier Oddone said money was a "big, big issue" threatening progress in the United States and he hoped the Higgs discovery would spur greater funding from US agencies and Congress.

"What I would hope is that this excitement, this focus of the world's attention on this discovery, will actually help a lot in stimulating and reestablishing particle physics in North America," Oddone said.

De Roeck said there were similar problems in Europe, where physicists will meet in September to discuss research priorities for the next 20 years and whether they need and can afford an accelerator after the LHC.

"That is going to be a tough fight," he said. "Despite this momentous moment we have now, it doesn't necessarily bring the funding which one would require."

He urged governments and other key contributors to see fundamental science as a "must" rather than a luxury.

"This is the only way we can actually move on and have a deeper understanding of how things work. It can only be in our benefit exploring that."

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persecond
3 / 5 (6) Jul 05, 2012
So we still don't know that the Higgs particle exist until we have more data.
Amadillo
2.7 / 5 (3) Jul 05, 2012
'God particle' a gateway to new vision of universe
But 'God particle' concept is fifty years old - i.e. two human generations. What's 'new' in contemporary physics, after then?
antialias_physorg
3.9 / 5 (12) Jul 05, 2012
But 'God particle' concept is fifty years old - i.e. two human generations. What's 'new' in contemporary physics, after then?

There's a difference between having a theory and having a theory that actually made a prediction that held (like the Higgs just did).

There are countless theories out there in physics. Many of which are still unproven (and most of which will eventually be consigned to the dustbin of history). With the Higgs we now have a chance of putting some of these to the test. Supersymmetry will probably be one of the first.

We have a new tool - and have more confidence in the standard model.
There's still a lot to learn but this discovery opens up a whole new chapter of possibilities.
infiniteMadness
5 / 5 (6) Jul 05, 2012
yeah, look at Hoyle's Steady State theory of the universe.

http://en.wikiped...e_theory

Many scientists at that time thought for it to be true, because it was so elegant.

Nature isnt always beautiful and elegant, even though math may seem so.
El_Nose
3.3 / 5 (4) Jul 05, 2012
we still cannot test for super symmetry -- no experiment, really nothing to observe is the issue. No theory of what to expect
Bewia
4.2 / 5 (5) Jul 05, 2012
The experimental tests of supersymetry indeed exist, the were made at LHC - and they failed. The supersymmetric predictions for Higgs boson indeed do exist and in some aspects they're testable easier, than the Standard Model itself. For example, the Standard Model poses no prediction for Higgs boson mass (only lower bound of it) - but the MSSM (Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model) does. But the Higgs boson found at 126 GeV is heavier, than MSSM predicts - in this sense the latest finding doesn't look so well for SUSY anyway.
TabulaMentis
1 / 5 (5) Jul 05, 2012
'God particle' a gateway to new vision of universe
But 'God particle' concept is fifty years old - i.e. two human generations. What's 'new' in contemporary physics, after then?
String Theory/M-theory did not exist fifty years ago. There is a relationship between dark energy/matter and Higgs bosons. Just hang in there.
typicalguy
3 / 5 (4) Jul 05, 2012
It would be great if the Higgs gave insight into dark matter/energy. As far as super symmetry, the obvious testable prediction are the super partners. Those particles should be found aftere the upgrade. Regardless of super symmetry being real or not, it would be fantastic to find new particles once the upgrade happens.
El_Nose
4 / 5 (6) Jul 05, 2012
so by definition - the first tachyon has been confirmed

-- no let me define tachyon before the wierdo's jump on

A tachyonic field, or simply tachyon, is a quantum field with an imaginary mass that represents an instability.

Perhaps the most famous example of a tachyon is the Higgs boson of the Standard model of particle physics. In its uncondensed phase, the Higgs field has a negative mass squared, and is therefore a tachyon.

The Higgs is it's own anti particle -- and gives the W W- and Z bosons their mass.

(*NOTE) by giving W and Z bosons mass -- it gives all things made of nuetrons, electrons, and protons mass and a few other more exotic particles
TabulaMentis
1 / 5 (3) Jul 05, 2012
El Nose:
Let me be the first weirdo to jump in. You spelled weirdo and neutron incorrectly. A Higgs field is made of one-dimensional particles. If you were to dissect the one-dimensional particle then FTL particles would come flying out of it! If you wish to call them tachyons then that is up to you. I like the word inflatons better or whatever word people come up with in the next one-thousand years.
Torbjorn_Larsson_OM
3 / 5 (2) Jul 05, 2012
@ Bevia:

I wouldn't use Woit as support, he has a belief in that string theory doesn't work and hence has problems with supersymmetry which is a requirement. A 125-126 GeV standard Higgs, if that is what it is, predicts supersymmetry at weak scales. [ http://arxiv.org/...97v1.pdf ]

@ El Nose:

Quite, you took it from here http://en.wikiped...ic_field , but also note that there isn't any tachyonic particles, no real ftl particles or signals. "all fundamental particles are regarded as localized excitations of fields. ... the instability prevents any such localized excitations from existing."

Interestingly the condensed Higgs field is still merely quasistable. (See the ref above.) The universe is slowly dying - again. (Heat death.)
typicalguy
1 / 5 (1) Jul 05, 2012
Now that we know the Higgs is real, what if any practical applications can be derived from this knowledge? I realize it may take decades (or centuries) before such technology is developed. That said, there have been many articles over the last year about cloaking from various things. Perhaps with better understanding of the Higgs we can cloak objects from the Higgs field. It would simulate antigravity but really it all we would be doing is shrouding an object so that the Higgs field does not interact with it.
Pressure2
2.3 / 5 (3) Jul 05, 2012
yeah, look at Hoyle's Steady State theory of the universe.

http://en.wikiped...e_theory

Many scientists at that time thought for it to be true, because it was so elegant.

Nature isnt always beautiful and elegant, even though math may seem so.

I wouldn't be so sure just yet, the BB theory may very well end up beside the SS theory in that dustbin.
vacuum-mechanics
1 / 5 (1) Jul 05, 2012
It would be great if the Higgs gave insight into dark matter/energy. As far as super symmetry, the obvious testable prediction are the super partners. Those particles should be found aftere the upgrade. Regardless of super symmetry being real or not, it would be fantastic to find new particles once the upgrade happens.

Here, may what you asking for, where there is no need to upgrade the equipment for finding the super partners according to the super symmetry.

http://www.vacuum...id=14=en
Pyle
not rated yet Jul 05, 2012
Now that we know the Higgs is real


Since I spammed another thread, here it is again:

Has A 125 GeV Pseudoscalar Resonance Been Observed at the LHC?
http://arxiv.org/...4702.pdf

Heavy quarkonium I say!
TabulaMentis
1 / 5 (4) Jul 05, 2012
It would be great if the Higgs gave insight into dark matter/energy.
Like I have said before; Dark Energy, Higgs Field and Spacetime Fabric are all the same thing combined and working together. From Dark Energy comes Dark Matter. Dark Matter can also be created by subatomic particles.
I realize it may take decades (or centuries) before such technology is developed.
The only thing that is going to take centuries will be understanding one-dimensional particles. Within fifty years everything else will pretty much be figured out. However, the first generation flying saucers will use Dark Matter, later followed by ones that use Dark Energy. Dark Energy will not produce radiation burns like Dark Matter.
vijaybook
3 / 5 (2) Jul 05, 2012
It would be great if the Higgs gave insight into dark matter/energy.
Like I have said before; Dark Energy, Higgs Field and Spacetime Fabric are all the same thing combined and working together. From Dark Energy comes Dark Matter. Dark Matter can also be created by subatomic particles.
I realize it may take decades (or centuries) before such technology is developed.
The only thing that is going to take centuries will be understanding one-dimensional particles. Within fifty years everything else will pretty much be figured out. However, the first generation flying saucers will use Dark Matter, later followed by ones that use Dark Energy. Dark Energy will not produce radiation burns like Dark Matter.


All have forgotten Satyendr Nath Bose on whose "Boson" was named. Without him it was difficult to find it.
TabulaMentis
4 / 5 (2) Jul 05, 2012
All have forgotten Satyendr Nath Bose on whose "Boson" was named. Without him it was difficult to find it.
You are absolutely correct. Not one mention of Bose?
Au-Pu
5 / 5 (3) Jul 06, 2012
Scientists have NEVER called the Higgs Boson "The God Particle"
They called it "The God damn particle" because they were having so much trouble in finding it.
Lame brained journalists, too ignorant to be able to get most things right, dropped the "damn" and made it the God particle.
ewj
1 / 5 (4) Jul 06, 2012
I may be missing something here. Does the HB exist? People speak as if it does. If my understanding is correct from the various statements from CERN . They have not said they have found it. Just yet more data. What happened to the embargo on releasing news before data was confirmed. A $1 cable problem causing he world to get excited ' LHC exceeds the speed of light'! Forgive my scepticism but this will turn out to be a similar event. Maybe not a cable - but yet more data which they don't know if it is confirmed a HB. The universe does not need a HB anyway. Matter is converted from energy simply by a variation in the expansion velocity. Max Plank gave us an insight into that. But since we live in a world where 'C' must be a constant we cannot move forward - just sideways and introspective. 'C' just happens to be constant at the moment - past 14billion years. When it changes all atoms will simply be coverted back into energy again.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (5) Jul 06, 2012
Does the HB exist? People speak as if it does.

The finding is consistent with it. The Higgs boson was predicted and there is something in the data there. But since you can't detect the Higgs directly it could also be another (heretofore unknown) boson.
What happened to the embargo on releasing news before data was confirmed.

Do you want to insititute one? Resaerch results are always released. The group that releases them double checks. But until you release it how else is anyon else going to know that there IS something to double check?
A $1 cable problem causing he world to get excited

If you remember: They sat on this data for 6 months to double check it in any way they could think of before releasing it. Their checking turned up no fault in that time.
Scientists aren't gods. they make mistakes like anyone else. They're just more honest it (AND double check their own work - something other people don't do)
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (5) Jul 06, 2012
The universe does not need a HB anyway.

The universe does not care what you think it needs or doesn't need (nor does it care what scientists think it needs or doesn't need, BTW). The universe is what it is.

Max Plank gave us an insight into that. But since we live in a world where 'C' must be a constant we cannot move forward - just sideways and introspective.

Then do the math, publish a paper. Show that EVERYTHING is consistent with your view (like the already MEASURED time dilation and the MEASURED mass increase at close to c - which is in complete contradiction to your 'theory'). If you manage that then you'll get a Nobel Priize for sure.

Remember that Einstein published his stuff in a world that didn't believe in a constant speed of light. If we can come over to that view then, if yours is 'better', we can come over to your view (but somehow I doubt it. The observed facts just don't support you.)
ewj
1 / 5 (3) Jul 06, 2012
"The finding is consistent with it". Sorry this is not a HB confirmation. Just more data which is subject to further consideration. Finding yet more particles is not a huge advance in our understanding of the universe. But it is interesting - nothing more. The statement Embargo is not my idea - but came from CERN HQ. After the light speed fiasco. Yes it is a fantastic project. My problem is with the core theories being researched. One would not require a HB if you can vary the value of 'C' in Max Planks theory. We are not permitted to do that - but one can theorise a universe where it does vary then all atoms dissociate naturally. The universe by virtue of its local 300kms determines the cohesive frequency in the standard model. Hence natural association or dissociation of atoms and baryonic materials. The fact that it is expanding locally at 300kms causes the atoms to remain as atoms. We keep discounting Newtons belief that the universe provides a background absolute.
ewj
1 / 5 (3) Jul 06, 2012
Thanks for your comment. Actually I have published a book on this view. It states in simple terms we exist in 4 real spatial dimensions. The primary being ( newtons absolute)Ut, x,y,z. The Euclidian spatials can only occur in Ut which happens to be an orthogonal opening and counter moving expansion of space second for second. Yes you are correct, please think on this point: All our observed neighbouring suns have sun spots. I have written a letter to MajGen Bolten at NASA. I cannot find any data which investigates sun spot simultaneity. IF, there is in fact simultaneity THEN there is information acting between them. This would then open the door to much discussion. Gravity Probe A&B confirm Einstein's predictions but in only 3 spatial dimensions. We have to look outside this box of 3D spacetime curvatures. & Minkowski ( his tutor ) that Proper time is a dimension. Nature does not need this side affect of 3D space to provide us the luxury of existence. We all have ideas.
ewj
1 / 5 (3) Jul 06, 2012
"(like the already MEASURED time dilation and the MEASURED mass increase at close to c - which is in complete contradiction to your 'theory')". These GFT and SFT predictions amazing as they are do not provide any explanation. In my book the explanations are provided very simply. And simply understood once one can comprehend the notion that we do indeed exist in an absolute framework of space and the fact that it is moving limits and determines the velocity of light - hence it is obliged to get heavier if you try and make it go faster. That propulsive momentum energy has to converted into mass. You cannot move a particle or photon into a dimension which has not yet been produced. You have to wait. Hence Ut is being produced at the rate of 300kms is providing new space second for second. This is such a simple and yet fantastic concept. Michleson continually argued with Einstein on the Etheral wind. Unfortunately they thought it had a uniform direction and Einstein discounted it.
TabulaMentis
3.7 / 5 (3) Jul 06, 2012
Lame brained journalists, too ignorant to be able to get most things right, dropped the "damn" and made it the God particle.
No. The magazine in which Leon Lederman wished to publish his article refused to print the "damn" word, so Leon changed the title to the God Particle. Some people will not allow scientists to slam God and the religious at will.
antialias_physorg
4.5 / 5 (4) Jul 06, 2012
"The finding is consistent with it". Sorry this is not a HB confirmation.

Observation is consistent with you being an idiot. For me that is enough confirmation to accept that you are an idiot.
I cannot find any data which investigates sun spot simultaneity.

Have you tried google? I just went to google scholar and got over 7000 hits (oldest paper I got on sunspot simultaneity was from 1892)
IF, there is in fact simultaneity THEN there is information acting between them.

No. That does not follow automatically. (Though one can make a case for correlation) but causation would not be demonstrable - certainly not since there are times when there is only a single sunspot.)
We all have ideas.

But some ideas are better than others (or others', in this case). Yours are BS.
ant_oacute_nio354
1 / 5 (4) Jul 06, 2012
Higgs doesn't exist. The mass is the electric dipole moment.
This particle is a neutral fermion.
Antonio Saraiva
ajps2@hotmail.com
Bowler_4007
not rated yet Jul 08, 2012
i give this article 3/5 rather than 5/5 for two reasons, they used the name/term "God particle" in the title and over use of the word portal, otherwise very interesting