New LHCb analysis still sees previous intriguing results

At a seminar today at CERN, the LHCb collaboration presented a new analysis of data from a specific transformation, or "decay," that a particle called B0 meson can undergo. The analysis is based on twice as many B0 decays ...

Machine-learning technology to track odd events among LHC data

Nowadays, artificial neural networks have an impact on many areas of our day-to-day lives. They are used for a wide variety of complex tasks, such as driving cars, performing speech recognition (for example, Siri, Cortana, ...

25 years on: A single top quark partners with the Z boson

A quarter-century after its discovery, physicists at the ATLAS Experiment at CERN are gaining new insight into the heaviest-known particle, the top quark. The huge amount of data collected during Run 2 of the LHC (2015-2018) ...

Exotic atomic nuclei reveal traces of new form of superfluidity

Recent observations of the internal structure of the rare isotope ruthenium-88 shed new light on the internal structure of atomic nuclei, a breakthrough that could also lead to further insights into how some chemical elements ...

Ultra-high energy events key to study of ghost particles

Physicists at Washington University in St. Louis have proposed a way to use data from ultra-high energy neutrinos to study interactions beyond the standard model of particle physics. The 'Zee burst' model leverages new data ...

LHCb explores the beauty of lepton universality

The LHCb collaboration has reported an intriguing new result in its quest to test a key principle of the Standard Model called lepton universality. Although not statistically significant, the finding—a possible difference ...

Taking the temperature of dark matter

Warm, cold, just right? Physicists at the University of California, Davis are taking the temperature of dark matter, the mysterious substance that makes up about a quarter of our universe.

Leptons help in tracking new physics

Electrons with 'colleagues'—other leptons—are one of many products of collisions observed in the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. According to theorists, some of these particles may be created in processes ...

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Standard Model

The Standard Model of particle physics is a theory of three of the four known fundamental interactions and the elementary particles that take part in these interactions. These particles make up all visible matter in the universe. The standard model is a gauge theory of the electroweak and strong interactions with the gauge group SU(3)×SU(2)×U(1).

Every high energy physics experiment carried out since the mid-20th century has eventually yielded findings consistent with the Standard Model. Still, the Standard Model falls short of being a complete theory of fundamental interactions because it does not include gravity, dark matter, or dark energy. It isn't quite a complete description of leptons either, because it does not describe nonzero neutrino masses, although simple natural extensions do.

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