Related topics: large hadron collider · accelerator · cern · particles · atoms

Calculating the benefits of exascale and quantum computers

A quintillion calculations a second. That's one with 18 zeros after it. It's the speed at which an exascale supercomputer will process information. The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing for the first exascale computer ...

Quantum simulators for gauge theories

To simulate in a laboratory what happens in particle accelerators has been an ambitious goal in the study of the fundamental forces of nature pursued by high-energy physicists for many years. Now, thanks to research conducted ...

Measuring the charge radii of exotic copper isotopes

Researchers at Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica in Belgium and The University of Manchester, in collaboration with other institutes worldwide, have recently carried out a study aimed at measuring the size of the nucleus ...

The power of attraction: Magnets in particle accelerators

In 1820, Hans Christian Oersted gave a demonstration on electricity to a class of advanced students at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. Using an early battery prototype, he looked to see what effect an electric current ...

Scientists create the first diamond X-ray micro lens

After fourth-generation synchrotrons were invented (these are particle accelerators, which are, in fact, giant research facilities), there was an urgent need for a fundamentally new optics that could withstand high temperatures ...

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Particle accelerator

A particle accelerator (or atom smasher) is a device that uses electric fields to propel electrically-charged particles to high speeds and to contain them in well-defined beams. An ordinary CRT television set is a simple form of accelerator. There are two basic types: linear accelerators and circular accelerators.

This page describes types of particle accelerators. For a list of existing and historic particle accelerators see: List of accelerators in particle physics.

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