Russian whizzes win global collegiate IT contest

May 17, 2012
Three Russian computer whizzes were crowned the world's top collegiate programmers Thursday, when they clobbered 111 other teams from across the globe to win the 36th annual "Battle of Brains" in Warsaw. The tournament is organised by IBM and the Association for Computing Machinery.

Three Russian computer whizzes were crowned the world's top collegiate programmers Thursday, when they clobbered 111 other teams from across the globe to win the 36th annual "Battle of Brains" in Warsaw.

Students Eugeniy Kapun, Mikhail Kever and Niyaz Nigmatullin from St. Petersburg State University of IT, Mechanics and Optics managed to solve nine of 12 problems in the allotted five hours, displaying the mental gymnastics required in the field.

"It's not inconceivable that someone from the floor will end up winning a ," Sal Vella, a vice president at IBM, which sponsored the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC), told AFP.

The top three teams were offered IBM jobs anywhere in the world, along with medals, plus a trophy for the St. Petersburg team coached by Andrey Stankevich.

Runner-ups from the University of Warsaw, which hosted the competition this year and has twice won in the past, also solved nine problems but took longer.

The problem sets featured real-world issues -- with headings like "Room Service" and "Bus Tour" -- requiring optimal solutions, like having to build the best between moving asteroids.

The 112 competing Thursday were all finalists of the earlier regional round that involved 25,000 students from over 2,200 universities in 85 countries.

The tournament is organised by IBM and the Association for Computing Machinery and held in a different city each year, with the 2013 edition to take place in St. Petersburg.

Explore further: Apple gives beta users a peek at OS X Yosemite

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Baker College wins cyber defense contest

Apr 24, 2008

Baker College of Flint, Mich., Texas A&M University and the University of Louisville have won top honors in the National Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition.

Cluster of video games maps brain

Sep 25, 2007

Four college students have devised a way to use a cluster of Sony PLAYSTATION3 video game consoles, for large-scale modeling of the human brain. Their design won them first place – and $10,000 – in IBM’s Cell Broadband ...

French-Russian mathematician Gromov wins Abel prize

Mar 26, 2009

French-Russian mathematician Mikhail Gromov on Thursday won one of the world's top mathematics award, Norway's Abel Prize, for "his revolutionary contributions to geometry," the prize committee said.

Teams battle to on-screen victory

Feb 08, 2008

Tanks, soldiers, snipers, mortars and bombers fanned out rapidly over unfamiliar undulating terrain, searching for their enemy counterparts and trying to seize control of battle towers. Some armies swarmed ...

Student-designed robots take on March Madness

Mar 16, 2012

(PhysOrg.com) -- Sixty-six national and international high school teams will take their robots to the courts this weekend to compete in the 21st season of the Los Angeles regional FIRST (For Inspiration and ...

Recommended for you

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Russkiycremepuff
3 / 5 (4) May 17, 2012
http://icpc.baylo...s%202012

Here is list of winners and the country. We are very proud of our Russian students and their achievements.