HTC smartphones blocked by US customs

May 16, 2012
The Sprint HTC Evo 4G smartphone is displayed in 2010. US mobile carrier Sprint said Wednesday it was delaying the introduction of an Android smartphone from Taiwan's HTC after the devices were blocked by US customs.

US mobile carrier Sprint said Wednesday it was delaying the introduction of an Android smartphone from Taiwan's HTC after the devices were blocked by US customs.

The move appeared to mark the first enforcement of a win in a trade complaint by Apple, which claimed Android devices infringed on its patents for one-tap screen commands.

Sprint said in a statement that the phone, known as the HTC EVO 4G LTE "has been delayed" and that "HTC is working to resolve this issue."

But the carrier said, "We can't provide specific timing for product availability at this time."

Sprint said it received a statement from HTC saying two phones being imported into the US were "delayed due to a standard US Customs review."

Apple won an order last December from the US , which issued a "limited exclusion order" directing that HTC stop bringing offending smartphones into the United States effective on April 19.

Taiwan-based HTC had expected to be able to adapt the Android-powered to sidestep the trouble with the single patent before the deadline.

The move was likely to come at the cost of removing some features smartphone users enjoy and came as part of an ongoing campaign by Apple to cobble the momentum of smartphones powered by Google's Android software.

Apple has accused and other makers using Google's Android mobile operating system of infringing on Apple-held patents. A separate case is pending against Samsung.

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User comments : 6

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SoylentGrin
5 / 5 (5) May 16, 2012
a trade complaint by Apple, which claimed Android devices infringed on its patents for one-tap screen commands.


Apple claimed to own the concept of tapping an icon? And won?!
Does anyone doubt that innovation is stifled by existing patent laws?
Why would I develop a new technique if the idea of "interacting with technology" or "displaying graphic data" or any other such nonsense is "owned" by someone else, giving them the right to my work?
Vendicar_Decarian
3.4 / 5 (5) May 16, 2012
Isn't the "free market" truly spectacular in the ways in which it limits competition?
kaasinees
3.3 / 5 (6) May 16, 2012
Does anyone doubt that innovation is stifled by existing patent laws?

There is no such thing as intelectual property.
Will apple pay to the person who invented icons?
Will apple pay to the person who invented tapping?
Will apple pay to the person who invented pixels?
Will apple pay to the person who invented toilets?
Will apple pay to the person who invented apples?

etc?

Apple patents are ridiculous.

Its only free market when it profits.
the USA is obsolete in these days HTC hardware is superior to apple and so is samsung but they cant ban samsung because that means no more asian hardware for their apple phones and then apple will be bankrupt.
Vendicar_Decarian
5 / 5 (2) May 16, 2012
Apple is now claiming that they own the idea of selecting a virtual keyboard layout from a menu.

Some other company is claiming they own the idea of selecting text based emoticons from a grid of possibilities.

This is free market "freedom".
insignificant_fish
not rated yet May 17, 2012
I am curious if apple would have bothered if the one x was not such a threat to iphone sales.
insignificant_fish
not rated yet May 17, 2012
I am curious if apple would have bothered if the one x was not such a threat to iphone sales.

http://geekaphone...Phone-4S

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