A better way to photo gray: New technology allows lenses to change color rapidly

Jul 12, 2011

A University of Connecticut scientist has perfected a method for creating quick-changing, variable colors in films and displays, such as sunglasses, that could lead to the next hot fashion accessory.

The new technology also has captured the interest of the U.S. military as a way to assist soldiers who need to be able to see clearly in rapidly changing environments.

The process for creating the lenses, for which a patent is pending, also is less expensive and less wasteful to manufacturers than previous methods. The findings were published July 7 in the .

"This is the next big thing for transition lenses," says Greg Sotzing, a professor of chemistry in UConn's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and a member of UConn's Polymer Program.

The typical material behind a transition lens is what's called a photochromic film, or a sheet of polymers that change color when light hits them. Sotzing's new technology does things slightly differently – his electrochromic lenses are controlled by an electric current passing through them when triggered by a stimulus, such as light.

"They're like double pane windows with a gap between them," explains Sotzing. He and his colleagues squirt a mixture of polymers – or as he calls it, "goop" – in between the layers, creating the lens as it hardens. The mixture of polymers used in this lens, says Sotzing, creates less waste and is less expensive to produce than previous mixtures.

"The lifetime of is usually very short," says Sotzing, who points out that people often misplace them. So by making the manufacturing less expensive, he says, commercial retailers will be able to produce more of them.

Another benefit of this material is that it can change as quickly as electricity passes through it – which is virtually instantaneously. This process could be very useful for the military, Sotzing says. For example, if a person emerges from a dark passageway and into the desert, a lens that would alter its color instantly to complement the surroundings could mean life or death for some soldiers.

"Right now, soldiers have to physically change the lenses in their goggles," Sotzing says. "This will eliminate that need." Sotzing will begin a one-year sabbatical at the Air Force Academy in August, where he hopes to develop some of these ideas.

In November 2010, partially based on work supported by the Center for Science and Technology Commercialization's Prototype Fund, the UConn R&D Corporation started a company, called Alphachromics Inc., with Sotzing and colleague Michael Invernale, now a post-doctoral researcher at MIT, as founders. The university has a pending for this new technology, which is currently under option to the company. Alphachromics is also testing applications of these systems for energy-saving windows and custom fabrics.

Currently in talks with sunglass manufacturers, Sotzing says that the world of Hollywood could have a market for this technology. He describes applications he calls "freaky," including colors that move back and forth across the glasses, evoking styles like those sported by Lady Gaga.

But Sotzing stresses that the best thing about this technology is the creation of business in Connecticut. Although the glasses won't be made here, the technology will be licensed out of the state and, he hopes, Alphachromics will continue to expand.

"We don't make the sunglasses," he says. "We make the formulation of what goes inside them."

Sotzing's collaborators on the paper are Invernale and Ph.D. students Yujie Ding, Donna Mamangun and Amrita Kumar. The research was funded by the tech/textile company ITP-GmbH.

Explore further: Privileged strategies for direct transformations of inert aliphatic carbon-hydrogen bonds

More information: Paper online: pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articl… g/2011/jm/c1jm11141h

Related Stories

White glow: Dye-doped DNA nanofibers emit white light

Jul 08, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Efficient energy transport plays an important role in the development of optoelectonic materials. The true masters of energy transfer via a hierarchical arrangement of different molecules are the photosynthetic ...

New sunglasses can also be used for 3-D viewing

Jan 10, 2010

With the hit movie "Avatar" creating a buzz around 3-D entertainment, a California company is touting what it believes are the first 3-D glasses which can also double as sunglasses.

World' First Transparent Ceramic Lens

Aug 02, 2004

CASIO, Inc., in conjunction with its parent company, CASIO COMPUTER CO., LTD., Tokyo, Japan today announced that using its proprietary optical technology, CASIO COMPUTER CO., LTD., has developed the world’s f ...

Electronic spectacles coming to market soon

Jun 23, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- US company PixelOptics has invented electronic spectacles that can automatically change focus as you lower your head to read a book, and could spell the end of the bifocal.

Recommended for you

Free pores for molecule transport

17 hours ago

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can take up gases similar to a sponge that soaks up liquids. Hence, these highly porous materials are suited for storing hydrogen or greenhouse gases. However, loading of many ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Nikola
1 / 5 (1) Jul 12, 2011
meh
bugmenot23
not rated yet Jul 12, 2011
Very exciting! This could lead to glasses with built in 3D HUDs, and integrate augmented reality, night vision and IR/UV sensing into your standard prescription glasses.
Skultch
not rated yet Jul 13, 2011
Hell yeah for ski goggles!! Light and visibility conditions can change rapidly with time or elevation. I have changed lenses many times on the lift, only to change them again for the next run. They already have goggles with 2D HUD to view GPS data, caller ID, texts, and music info.