The University of Connecticut, (UConn) was established in 1881 under its former name Storrs Agricultural School. UConn was officially established in 1939. Today, UConn has ten schools and campuses on the main campus in Storrs, Connecticut and separate schools of law and social work in Hartford as well as schools of medicine and dental in Farmington. UConn has a student body of more than 29,000 undergraduate, graduate and professional degree students. The university is consistently rated in the top 30 of public universities within the United States.

Address
850 Bolton Road, Unit 1085, Storrs, CT 06269-1085
Website
http://www.uconn.edu
Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Connecticut

Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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Stretching makes the superconductor

When people imagine "new materials," they typically think of chemistry. But UConn physicist Ilya Sochnikov has another suggestion: mechanics.

How tadpoles provide insight into pandemics

A virus affecting wood frog tadpoles throughout the eastern United States is offering scientists a rare opportunity to investigate the role of environmental factors in the spread of infectious disease.

More carbon in the ocean can lead to smaller fish

As humans continue to send large quantities of carbon into the atmosphere, much of that carbon is absorbed by the ocean, and UConn researchers have found high CO2 concentrations in water can make fish grow smaller.

Review of microfinance studies finds many flaws, no conclusions

What do we know about microfinance—often touted as the solution for the economic woes of developing countries? Practically nothing, say researchers from UConn's Department of Agricultural and Resources and Economics.

Evolution makes the world less ragged

How does evolution impact ecological patterns? It helps smooth out the rough edges, says UConn Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Professor Mark Urban. Urban led an international team of researchers through a review of the ...

Buzzing to rebuild broken bone

Healing broken bones could get easier with a device that provides both a scaffold for the bone to grow on and electrical stimulation to urge it forward, UConn engineers reported on June 27 in the Journal of Nano Energy.

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