Ultra-thin solar blind EUV imager reported by Imec

Dec 08, 2010

Yesterday at the International Electron Devices Meeting in San Francisco imec presents an ultra-thin hybrid AlGaN-on-Si-based extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imager with only 10µm pixel-to-pixel pitch. The wide-bandgap material (AlGaN) provides insensitivity to visible wavelengths and enhanced UV radiation hardness compared to silicon. Backside illumination in a hybrid design was used to achieve a very small pitch-to-pitch (10µm only). The novel imager shows an excellent detection down to a wavelength of 1nm.

Ultraviolet detection is of particular interest for solar science, EUV microscopy and advanced EUV lithography tools. Sensors using wide-bandgap materials overcome the drawbacks of Si-based sensors such as their sensitivity to UV radiation damage and the need for filters to block the unnecessary visible and infrared radiation.

’s backside illuminated EUV imager is based on a state-of-the-art hybrid design integrating an AlGaN sensor on a silicon readout chip. A submicron thick AlGaN layer was grown on a Si(111) wafer using molecular beam epitaxy and a focal plane array of 256x256 pixels with a pixel-to-pixel pitch of 10 micron was processed. Each pixel contains a Schottky diode optimized for backside illumination.

A custom read-out chip, based on capacitance transimpedance amplifiers, was fabricated in 0.35µm CMOS technology. The AlGaN wafer and read-out chip were post-processed with indium solder bumps with 10µm pixel-to-pixel pitch achieving excellent uniformity. The focal plane array and read-out chip were assembled using flip-chip bonding and subsequently the silicon substrate was locally removed to enable backside illumination of the active AlGaN layer. Finally, the imager was packaged and wire-bonded. Measurements demonstrated an excellent response down to a wavelength of 1nm.

These results were obtained in collaboration with CRHEA/CNRS (France) and the Royal Observatory of Belgium in the framework of the BOLD project of the European Space Agency (ESA).

Explore further: Quick-change materials break the silicon speed limit for computers

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

World's Smallest 2.0µm-Pixel MOS Image Sensor

Feb 09, 2005

Panasonic, the leading brand by which Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. is known, today announced the development of the world's smallest image sensor. The revolutionary MOS image sensor has only 2.0 × 2.0 μm ...

Sony develops new back-illuminated CMOS image sensor

Jun 11, 2008

Sony Corporation today announced the development of a back-illuminated CMOS image sensor (pixel size: 1.75µm square pixels, five effective mega pixels, 60 frames/s) with significantly enhanced imaging characteristics, ...

IMEC reports major progress in EUV

Jul 14, 2008

IMEC reports functional 0.186µm2 32nm SRAM cells made with FinFETs from which the contact layer was successfully printed using ASML’s full field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Alpha Demo Tool (ADT). Applied ...

Recommended for you

Oculus unveils new prototype VR headset

22 hours ago

Oculus has unveiled a new prototype of its virtual reality headset. However, the VR company still isn't ready to release a consumer edition.

Wireless sensor transmits tumor pressure

Sep 20, 2014

The interstitial pressure inside a tumor is often remarkably high compared to normal tissues and is thought to impede the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents as well as decrease the effectiveness of radiation ...

Tim Cook puts personal touch on iPhone 6 launch

Sep 20, 2014

Apple chief Tim Cook personally kicked off sales of the iPhone 6, joining in "selfies" and shaking hands with customers Friday outside the company's store near his Silicon Valley home.

Team improves solar-cell efficiency

Sep 19, 2014

New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago's chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular ...

Calif. teachers fund to boost clean energy bets

Sep 19, 2014

The California State Teachers' Retirement System says it plans to increase its investments in clean energy and technology to $3.7 billion, from $1.4 billion, over the next five years.

User comments : 0