Chinese supercomputer named world's fastest

Nov 14, 2010
Illustration of binary code. China overtook the United States at the head of the world of supercomputing on Sunday when a survey ranked one of its machines the fastest on the planet.

China overtook the United States at the head of the world of supercomputing on Sunday when a survey ranked one of its machines the fastest on the planet.

Tianhe-1, meaning Milky Way, achieved a computing speed of 2,570 trillion calculations per second, earning it the number one spot in the Top 500 (www.top500.org) survey of supercomputers.

The Jaguar computer at a US government facility in Tennessee, which had held the top spot, was ranked second with a speed of 1,750 trillion calculations per second.

Tianhe-1 does its warp-speed "thinking" at the National Centre for in the northern port city of Tianjin -- using mostly chips designed by US companies.

Another Chinese system, the Nebulae machine at the National Supercomputing Centre in the southern city of Shenzhen, came in third.

The still dominates, with more than half of the entries in the Top 500 list, but now boasts 42 systems in the rankings, putting it ahead of , France, Germany and Britain.

It is not the first time that the United States has had its digital crown stolen by an Asian upstart. In 2002, Japan made a machine with more power than the top 20 American computers put together.

The supercomputers on the Top 500 list, which is produced twice a year, are rated based on speed of performance in a benchmark test by experts from Germany and the United States.

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More information: www.physorg.com/news/2010-10-c… t-supercomputer.html

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User comments : 19

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Vendicar_Decarian
2 / 5 (9) Nov 14, 2010
Half of the computing power of this machine comes from Nvidia graphic co-processors, a company that will soon be owned by China.

And unlike America, the computing power of this machine will be used to design nuclear weapons.

StarDust21
1.5 / 5 (4) Nov 14, 2010
Half of the computing power of this machine comes from Nvidia graphic co-processors, a company that will soon be owned by China.

And unlike America, the computing power of this machine will be used to design nuclear weapons.


how will nvidia be owned by china?

I agree with the second part though, I doubt that computer was made for useful science purposes

trekgeek1
5 / 5 (4) Nov 14, 2010
They don't need a supercomputer of this magnitude to make nuclear weapons. Could they use it to create more powerful nuclear weapons? Probably, I'm not a physicist, so I can't be sure though. I'm not worried however, because there is no point worrying about the creation of a weapon that can destroy the world ten times over when we already have weapons that can do it 5 times over. Once is enough to matter, and any weapons that are created will be no more of a threat to us than conventional WMD's.
Daniel_Cousens
not rated yet Nov 14, 2010
Unless they want to design nukes that take out the entire Solar System, I'm sure this will be used in other more speculative fields; regardless if its related to Defense research.
Grizzled
not rated yet Nov 14, 2010
I'm not worried however, because there is no point worrying about the creation of a weapon that can destroy the world ten times over when we already have weapons that can do it 5 times over.

It's not a matter of brute power but of sophistication these days. If you know what you are doing, you can tweak the output of those processes to produce different mix of effect - from nearly pure gamma-ray radiation bursts with little kinetic/heat output to relatively low levels of contamination with long-lived isotopes to not-so-powerfull but directed beam-like controlled explosions. This is where detailed modelling is advisable before you go ahead and evaporate your testing grounds with a faulty prototype.
Grizzled
not rated yet Nov 14, 2010
Another obvious application of course is cryptography. Protein folding is another. There is no shortage of tasks waiting for this kind of computing power.
Vendicar_Decarian
2.3 / 5 (3) Nov 14, 2010
Actually I wrote the following...

"And unlike America, the computing power of this machine will not be used to design nuclear weapons."

Someone edited out the "NOT" part.

Gee, I wonder why....

Vendicar_Decarian
2 / 5 (4) Nov 14, 2010
"how will nvidia be owned by china?" - Stardust

Nvidia will soon be bankrupt and it will be purchased by Via.
trekgeek1
5 / 5 (3) Nov 14, 2010
Actually I wrote the following...

"And unlike America, the computing power of this machine will not be used to design nuclear weapons."

Someone edited out the "NOT" part.

Gee, I wonder why....



Or you intended to write "not" and forgot. I believe the application of Occam's razor is needed here. We've all typed too quickly or just plain forgot to write a word. The theory that someone changed the comment is a little far fetched.
Grizzled
1 / 5 (1) Nov 15, 2010
Actually I wrote the following...

"And unlike America, the computing power of this machine will not be used to design nuclear weapons."

Someone edited out the "NOT" part.

Gee, I wonder why....



Or you intended to write "not" and forgot. I believe the application of Occam's razor is needed here. We've all typed too quickly or just plain forgot to write a word. The theory that

The other theory of course is thanks to the good old uncle Freud - you wrote what you actually meant but were afraid to admit (even to yourself).
Vendicar_Decarian
2.3 / 5 (3) Nov 15, 2010
"Or you intended to write "not" and forgot"

No I wrote "not" and then decided to capitalize it before submission.

And now it is gone entirely.

Hmmmmmm I wonder who removed it and why.

finitesolutions
1 / 5 (1) Nov 15, 2010
If ibm simulated the brain of a cat with 1 of they "supercomputers" with this new machine the chinesse can simulate the brain of a scientist. You can not do proper research without proper tools. Technology produces even more technology.
frajo
3 / 5 (2) Nov 15, 2010
"Or you intended to write "not" and forgot"

No I wrote "not" and then decided to capitalize it before submission.

And now it is gone entirely.

Hmmmmmm I wonder who removed it and why.
You are using Windows and IE?
lengould100
not rated yet Nov 15, 2010
Vendicar Decarian: The human brain is an extremely poor witness. Unless you have documentation of the original submission and your correction as submitted, I'd suggest that Ocam applies.
nada
5 / 5 (1) Nov 15, 2010
Actually I wrote the following...

"And unlike America, the computing power of this machine will not be used to design nuclear weapons."

Someone edited out the "NOT" part.

Gee, I wonder why....



Obviously, the Chinese are already using their supercomputer for nefarious ends - to break into this website just to edit your posts! Bauaawwhhahhh hhaa hhaaaaa!
rgwalther
3 / 5 (2) Nov 20, 2010
It turns out to be a good thing that Mao the Monster exterminated 100 milion mostly liberal, educated Chinese. Imagine where the Chinese would be today if the enlightened Chinese leadership did not continue Mao's glorious legacy of killing, torturing and incarcerating the more intelligent and free-thinking citizens of the great new superpower of glorious China!
I feel certain that the average Chinese person is no different than the average person anywhere, and I wish the Chinese people the best. The leadership of China has been exemplified by totalitarian sociopaths since the dawn of civilization, (Amazingly like Catholic/Muslim/Jewish). The current batch of suit wearing megalomaniacs seems to be learning that you cannot have lasting progress without free exchange of ideas.
For all of those trumpeting the fall of the US and the rise of China, ask yourself this: "Which country would you rather have as your Police?"
Just 2010'ing an old German joke. The funniest jokes are alway true.
Buyck
3 / 5 (1) Nov 21, 2010
2,570 trillion calculations per second is already outdated. By a couple of months it will be beaten by the VS. "Blue Waters" will be 4 times faster then Tianhe-1. And many others 10 Pflops systems will follow like "Sequoia" (IBM), "Project K" (Fujitsu), "Pleiades" (SGI and Intel) and so on...

links:
http://www.ncsa.i...eWaters/
http://www-03.ibm...6599.wss
http://www.fujits...-01.html

Baseline
not rated yet Nov 21, 2010
I am inclined to believe it likely that this system will be used in China's advanced fusion power program rather than for military uses.

rgwalther
1 / 5 (1) Nov 26, 2010
I am inclined to believe it likely that this system will be used in China's advanced fusion power program rather than for military uses.

You undoubtably also believe in the tooth fairy.