AIM-enabled version of imstar* released

May 26, 2006

Interactive media company Bandalong Entertainment said Thursday it reached an agreement with AOL over an AIM-enabled version of imstar*.

The new version will be built on the Open Aim platform, said the company, which provides a lifelike 3-D avatar-based instant-messaging program for teens.

"We are thrilled to announce the imstar* integration with AOL's AIM service," said Bob Carter, founder of Bandalong Entertainment. "We are now able to offer the millions of teens on AIM a great way to showcase their creativity while chatting. Through imstar*, teens can decide how they wish to be seen on any given day."

Imstar* members need only to log onto the program using their AIM screen names to access the customized version of their AOL or AIM Buddy List for imstar*.

"We opened the AIM platform to communities, companies and developers because we recognize and value the benefits that creative programs like imstar* can bring to our users," added Marcien Jenckes, vice president and general manager for AOL's AIM service. "The custom imstar* client offers teens enhanced self expression with engaging avatars that bring a new level of excitement to instant messaging. We are very pleased to welcome imstar* users to the growing AIM community."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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