Scientists identify how harmless gut bacteria 'turn bad'

An international team of scientists has determined how harmless E. coli gut bacteria in chickens can easily pick up the genes required to evolve to cause a life-threatening infection. Their study, published in Nature Communications, ...

Thinking afresh about how cells respond to stress

Just like people, cells get stressed too. A sudden drop in oxygen, overheating, or toxins can trigger a cascade of molecular changes that lead cells to stop growing, produce stress-protective factors, and form stress granules—proteins ...

New compact model for gene regulation in higher organisms

Although the DNA and its double-helix are one of the most familiar molecules of our time, our knowledge of how cells control what genes they want to express is still rather limited. In order to create, for example, an enzyme, ...

Warbler coloration shaped by evolution via distinct paths

Two genes that are important for the diverse colors and patterns of warbler plumage have evolved through two very different processes, according to a new study led by Penn State researchers. These evolutionary processes could ...

Algorithm could identify disease-associated genes

ITMO University's bioinformatics researchers have developed an algorithm that helps to assess the influence of genes on processes in the human body, including the development of disease. The research was published in BMC ...

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