Related topics: gulf of mexico · ocean · ocean floor · earthquake · deep ocean

Seafloor spreading has been slowing down

A new global analysis of the last 19 million years of seafloor spreading rates found they have been slowing down. Geologists want to know why the seafloor is getting sluggish.

Exploration and evaluation of deep-sea mining sites

The seafloor near a mid-ocean ridge is often home to rising hydrothermal fluids from the deep crust that deposit minerals on the ocean bottom. These seafloor massive sulfide deposits offer new sources of copper, zinc, lead, ...

Collecting more than just seismic data along the Cascadia Fault

Down in the main lab of the R/V Marcus Langseth, you'll find an array of monitors—46, to be exact!—all displaying information about the data we're collecting. While many of the screens are dedicated to monitoring the ...

Some seafloor microbes can take the heat: Here's what they eat

It's cold in the depths of the world's oceans; most of the seafloor is at a chilly 4°C. Not so the seafloor of Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California. Here, tectonic plates drift apart and heat from Earth's interior can ...

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Seabed

The seabed (also known as the seafloor, sea floor, or ocean floor) is the bottom of the ocean. At the bottom of the continental slope is the continental rise, which is caused by sediment cascading down the continental slope. The seabed has been explored by submersibles such as Alvin and, to some extent, scuba divers with special apparatuses. The process that continually adds new material to the ocean floor is seafloor spreading and the continental slope.

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