Related topics: gulf of mexico · seafloor · sea floor · deep ocean

Mechanical forces of biofilms could play role in infections

The vast majority of bacteria in the world live on surfaces by forming structures called biofilms. These communities host thousands to millions of bacteria of different types, and are so biologically complex and active that ...

A review of ridge subduction, magmatism and metallogenesis

Generally speaking, 'ridge subduction' involves subduction of spreading oceanic ridges, aseismic ridges or oceanic plateaus and inactive arc ridges, and this common and important geological process has become one of the hot ...

Shock to bacteria activates nature's electrical grid

The ocean floor and the ground beneath our feet are riddled with tiny nanowires—1/100,000th the width of a human hair—created by billions of bacteria that can generate electric currents from organic waste. In new research ...

page 1 from 36

Seabed

The seabed (also known as the seafloor, sea floor, or ocean floor) is the bottom of the ocean. At the bottom of the continental slope is the continental rise, which is caused by sediment cascading down the continental slope. The seabed has been explored by submersibles such as Alvin and, to some extent, scuba divers with special apparatuses. The process that continually adds new material to the ocean floor is seafloor spreading and the continental slope.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA