Related topics: gulf of mexico · seafloor · sea floor · deep ocean

UN meet sees blitz of pledges to protect ailing oceans

A major UN conference on how to restore the faltering health of global oceans kicked off in Lisbon this week with a flurry of promises to expand marine protected areas, ban deep-sea mining, and combat illegal fishing.

Study: Humans responsible for over 90% of world's oil slicks

A team of U.S. and Chinese scientists mapping oil pollution across the Earth's oceans has found that more than 90% of chronic oil slicks come from human sources, a much higher proportion than previously estimated.

How 'viral dark matter' may help mitigate climate change

A deep dive into the 5,500 marine RNA virus species scientists recently identified has found that several may help drive carbon absorbed from the atmosphere to permanent storage on the ocean floor.

Cooling speeds up electrons in bacterial nanowires

The ground beneath our feet and under the ocean floor is an electrically-charged grid, the product of bacteria "exhaling" excess electrons through tiny nanowires in an environment lacking oxygen.

Shipping poses significant threat to the endangered whale shark

Marine biologists from the Marine Biological Association (MBA) and the University of Southampton have led ground-breaking research which indicates that lethal collisions of whale sharks with large ships are vastly underestimated, ...

Dynamics of ocean worlds likely controlled by their rotation

Discovering that many of the large moons in the outer solar system may host significant subsurface oceans of liquid water has been a key advance in planetary science. These moons represent some of the most promising habitats ...

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Seabed

The seabed (also known as the seafloor, sea floor, or ocean floor) is the bottom of the ocean. At the bottom of the continental slope is the continental rise, which is caused by sediment cascading down the continental slope. The seabed has been explored by submersibles such as Alvin and, to some extent, scuba divers with special apparatuses. The process that continually adds new material to the ocean floor is seafloor spreading and the continental slope.

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