Related topics: gulf of mexico · oil spills · ocean floor · oil · deep ocean

Deep-sea worms and bacteria team up to harvest methane

Scientists at Caltech and Occidental College have discovered a methane-fueled symbiosis between worms and bacteria at the bottom of the sea, shedding new light on the ecology of deep-sea environments.

Why Venice is actually a textbook case for flood prevention

When the worst floods since 1966 submerged the city of Venice in November 2019, the blame was laid on its incomplete mobile flood gates. They have been under construction since 2003 but were not ready in time to save the ...

Drilling the seabed below Earth's most powerful ocean current

The Antarctic Circumpolar Current is the planet's most powerful and arguably most important. It is the only one to flow clear around the globe without getting diverted by any landmass, sending up to 150 times the flow of ...

Diving to new depths for Antarctic science

A University of Canterbury scientist is using Kiwi technology in her Antarctic research to capture fascinating footage of life beneath the surface in McMurdo Sound.

Science vessel for ocean mission arrives in Seychelles

The science vessel of British-based Nekton Mission arrived in the Seychelles on Friday to begin the first stage of a multi-year mission to explore the depths of the Indian Ocean and document the effects of global warming ...

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Seabed

The seabed (also known as the seafloor, sea floor, or ocean floor) is the bottom of the ocean. At the bottom of the continental slope is the continental rise, which is caused by sediment cascading down the continental slope. The seabed has been explored by submersibles such as Alvin and, to some extent, scuba divers with special apparatuses. The process that continually adds new material to the ocean floor is seafloor spreading and the continental slope.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA