Related topics: catalyst · fuel cell

Materials scientists create stronger cobalt for fuel cells

A multi-institutional research team led by materials scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has designed a highly active and durable catalyst that doesn't rely on costly platinum to spur the necessary ...

Cathodic corrosion—devastating but predictable

An indian stepwell on a nanoscale. That is what postdoc Nakkiran Arulmozhi calls the pattern he saw when he corroded a special kind of platinum crystal. The unique images show the destructiveness of the process, but also ...

New research shows the limitations of coordination in chemistry

A common assumption in chemistry is that the coordination number of a catalyst's surface determines the reactivity of the reaction it catalyzes. Strikingly, chemists from Leiden University have now proven that this is not ...

Single-atom-thin platinum makes a great chemical sensor

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, together with colleagues from other universities, have discovered the possibility to prepare one-atom thin platinum for use as a chemical sensor. The results were ...

Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles are becoming longer lasting

Roughly 1 billion cars and trucks zoom about the world's roadways. Only a few run on hydrogen. This could change after a breakthrough achieved by researchers at the University of Copenhagen. The breakthrough? A new catalyst ...

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Platinum

Platinum (pronounced /ˈplætɨnəm/) is a chemical element with the chemical symbol Pt and an atomic number of 78. Its name is derived from the Spanish term platina del Pinto, which is literally translated into "little silver of the Pinto River." It is in Group 10 of the periodic table of elements. A dense, malleable, ductile, precious, gray-white transition metal, platinum is resistant to corrosion and occurs in some nickel and copper ores along with some native deposits. Platinum is used in jewelry, laboratory equipment, electrical contacts and electrodes, platinum resistance thermometers, dentistry equipment, and catalytic converters. Platinum bullion has the ISO currency code of XPT. Platinum is a commodity with a value that fluctuates according to market forces. On June 5, 2009, Platinum was worth $1263.00 per troy ounce (approximately $40.09 per gram).

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