Related topics: catalyst ยท fuel cell

Double-layered catalyst generates more hydrogen

Hydrogen-generating catalysts can create synergistic effects when different materials are layered with their unique properties. Recently, a Korean research team has developed a technology to enhance the hydrogen generation ...

A unique catalyst paves the way for plastic upcycling

A recently developed catalyst for breaking down plastics continues to advance plastic upcycling processes. In 2020, a team of researchers led by Ames Laboratory scientists developed the first processive inorganic catalyst ...

New understanding of key fuel cell catalyst

Research between the University of Liverpool and University of Alicante Spain, has identified the surface species at low potentials on the leading fuel cell catalyst, platinum (Pt), which is significant to the development ...

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Platinum

Platinum (pronounced /ˈplætɨnəm/) is a chemical element with the chemical symbol Pt and an atomic number of 78. Its name is derived from the Spanish term platina del Pinto, which is literally translated into "little silver of the Pinto River." It is in Group 10 of the periodic table of elements. A dense, malleable, ductile, precious, gray-white transition metal, platinum is resistant to corrosion and occurs in some nickel and copper ores along with some native deposits. Platinum is used in jewelry, laboratory equipment, electrical contacts and electrodes, platinum resistance thermometers, dentistry equipment, and catalytic converters. Platinum bullion has the ISO currency code of XPT. Platinum is a commodity with a value that fluctuates according to market forces. On June 5, 2009, Platinum was worth $1263.00 per troy ounce (approximately $40.09 per gram).

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