Related topics: catalyst · fuel cell

Wood-based catalyst to keep fruit fresh

If freshly bought bananas are stored in a full fruit basket, then they won't stay yellow very long. Just a few days later, the crooked fruits take on a brownish color and are more likely to be thrown away than be eaten. The ...

An 'exceptionally stable' single-atom catalyst

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have shown that single platinum atoms trapped in C12A7 crystals act as a stable and effective catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes, an essential process in ...

The roughening of a platinum electrode

Smooth platinum electrodes roughen and wear when subjected to repeated cycles of oxidation and reduction, which causes nanometer scale mounds to grow. Leiden chemists Leon Jacobse and Mark Koper, together with physicist Marcel ...

Tiny swimming donuts deliver the goods

Bacteria and other swimming microorganisms evolved to thrive in challenging environments, and researchers struggle to mimic their unique abilities for biomedical technologies, but fabrication challenges created a manufacturing ...

New catalyst outshines platinum for producing hydrogen

Hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, packs a powerful punch. And because it contains no carbon, it produces only water when used as a fuel. But on Earth, hydrogen most often exists in combination with other ...

Shocking heat waves stabilize single atoms

Single atoms work great as catalysts, but they usually don't stay single for long. Argonne scientists are part of a team that uses high-temperature shock waves to keep them in their place.

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Platinum

Platinum (pronounced /ˈplætɨnəm/) is a chemical element with the chemical symbol Pt and an atomic number of 78. Its name is derived from the Spanish term platina del Pinto, which is literally translated into "little silver of the Pinto River." It is in Group 10 of the periodic table of elements. A dense, malleable, ductile, precious, gray-white transition metal, platinum is resistant to corrosion and occurs in some nickel and copper ores along with some native deposits. Platinum is used in jewelry, laboratory equipment, electrical contacts and electrodes, platinum resistance thermometers, dentistry equipment, and catalytic converters. Platinum bullion has the ISO currency code of XPT. Platinum is a commodity with a value that fluctuates according to market forces. On June 5, 2009, Platinum was worth $1263.00 per troy ounce (approximately $40.09 per gram).

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