Related topics: catalyst · fuel cell

Nanoparticle colloid systems in molten inorganic salts

(Phys.org)—Colloidal systems are important in nanoscience and materials. A colloidal system involves the dispersion of particles within a solvent. A stable colloid has evenly dispersed solute particles while unstable colloids ...

For faster, larger graphene add a liquid layer

Millimetre-sized crystals of high-quality graphene can be made in minutes instead of hours using a new scalable technique, Oxford University researchers have demonstrated.

Novel catalyst used to make styrene in one step

(Phys.org)—Styrene is an important industrial chemical. It is the precursor to polystyrene which is used in various every day plastic products, like disposable cups, packaging, and insulation. Over 18.5m tons of styrene ...

Cheap hybrid outperforms rare metal as fuel-cell catalyst

(Phys.org) —Graphene quantum dots created at Rice University grab onto graphene platelets like barnacles attach themselves to the hull of a boat. But these dots enhance the properties of the mothership, making them better ...

3D graphene: Solar cells' new platinum?

One of the most promising types of solar cells has a few drawbacks. A scientist at Michigan Technological University may have overcome one of them.

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Platinum

Platinum (pronounced /ˈplætɨnəm/) is a chemical element with the chemical symbol Pt and an atomic number of 78. Its name is derived from the Spanish term platina del Pinto, which is literally translated into "little silver of the Pinto River." It is in Group 10 of the periodic table of elements. A dense, malleable, ductile, precious, gray-white transition metal, platinum is resistant to corrosion and occurs in some nickel and copper ores along with some native deposits. Platinum is used in jewelry, laboratory equipment, electrical contacts and electrodes, platinum resistance thermometers, dentistry equipment, and catalytic converters. Platinum bullion has the ISO currency code of XPT. Platinum is a commodity with a value that fluctuates according to market forces. On June 5, 2009, Platinum was worth $1263.00 per troy ounce (approximately $40.09 per gram).

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