Related topics: cells · protein · plants · blood vessels · cancer cells

Study discovers how some single-cell organisms control microbiomes

Large swaths of single-celled eukaryotes, non-bacterial single-cell organisms like microalgae, fungi or mold, can control microbiomes (a collection of tiny microbes, mostly bacteria) by secreting unusual small molecules around ...

Phosphate polymer forms a cornerstone of metabolic control

In a changing climate, understanding how organisms respond to stress conditions is increasingly important. New work led by Carnegie's Arthur Grossman and Emanuel Sanz-Luque could enable scientists to engineer the metabolism ...

Wildfires are changing forest communities in interior Alaska

As boreal forest wildfires increase in severity and frequency, new patterns of post-fire recovery are emerging. Research led by Jill Johnstone and colleagues at the U.S. National Science Foundation-supported Bonanza Creek ...

Researchers develop simple method to 3-D print milk products

Researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have developed a method to perform direct ink writing (DIW) 3-D printing of milk-based products at room temperature while maintaining its temperature-sensitive ...

Why plants in wetlands are highly productive

Environmental scientists of Leiden University have found that the so-called leaf economics spectrum for plants can not only be applied to terrestrial ecosystems, such as forests and grasslands, but also to wetlands. Furthermore, ...

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Nutrient

A nutrient is a chemical that an organism needs to live and grow or a substance used in an organism's metabolism which must be taken in from its environment. They are used to build and repair tissues, regulate body processes and are converted to and used as energy. Methods for nutrient intake vary, with animals and protists consuming foods that are digested by an internal digestive system, but most plants ingest nutrients directly from the soil through their roots or from the atmosphere.

Organic nutrients include carbohydrates, fats, proteins (or their building blocks, amino acids), and vitamins. Inorganic chemical compounds such as dietary minerals, water, and oxygen may also be considered nutrients. A nutrient is said to be "essential" if it must be obtained from an external source, either because the organism cannot synthesize it or produces insufficient quantities. Nutrients needed in very small amounts are micronutrients and those that are needed in larger quantities are called macronutrients. The effects of nutrients are dose-dependent and shortages are called deficiencies.

See healthy diet for more information on the role of nutrients in human nutrition.

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