Embryonic cells sense stiffness in order to form the face

Cells in the developing embryo can sense the stiffness of other cells around them, which is key to them moving together to form the face and skull, finds a new study by UCL researchers.

When it comes to regrowing tails, neural stem cells are the key

Cut off a salamander's tail and, in a few weeks, a near-perfect replacement grows. Do the same to a lizard and a new tail will regrow, but it won't be the same as the original. By comparing tail regeneration between the two ...

New origin theory for cells that gave rise to vertebrates

The vivid pigmentation of zebras, the massive jaws of sharks, the fight or flight instinct and the diverse beaks of Darwin's finches. These and other remarkable features of the world's vertebrates stem from a small group ...

Scientists create stable, self-renewing neural stem cells

In a paper published in the April 25 early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, the Gladstone Institutes in San ...

Human ES cells progress slowly in myelin's direction

Scientists from the University of Wisconsin, USA, report in the journal Development the successful generation from human embryonic stem cells of a type of cell that can make myelin, a finding that opens up new possibilities ...

How squid and octopus get their big brains

Cephalopods—which include octopus, squid, and their cuttlefish cousins—are capable of some truly charismatic behaviors. They can quickly process information to transform shape, color, and even texture, blending in with ...

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Neurogenesis

Neurogenesis (birth of neurons) is the process by which neurons are created. Most active during pre-natal development, neurogenesis is responsible for populating the growing brain.

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