Related topics: stem cells · cells · protein · molecules

Algorithm predicts which students will drop out of math courses

In the so-called MINT subjects—mathematics, computer science, natural sciences and technology—up to 40 percent of students drop out of their studies in the introductory phase. A research team from the Methods Center of ...

Chemists use DNA to build the world's tiniest antenna

Researchers at Université de Montréal have created a nanoantenna to monitor the motions of proteins. Reported this week in Nature Methods, the device is a new method to monitor the structural change of proteins over time—and ...

Enlarging windows into understanding gene functions

In a text file, the rows of letters A, T, C and G appearing over and over in a dizzying array of combinations, are unremarkable, save perhaps for the absence of all the other letters of the alphabet. Yet the specific sequence ...

Artificial intelligence makes great microscopes better than ever

To observe the swift neuronal signals in a fish brain, scientists have started to use a technique called light-field microscopy, which makes it possible to image such fast biological processes in 3D. But the images are often ...

Key enzymes for synthesizing natural products

Plants, fungi and bacteria produce natural products that function as defenses that are deployed against predators and competitors. In medicine, these compounds have such applications as antibiotics, cancer drugs and cholesterol ...

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Nature (journal)

Nature is a prominent scientific journal, first published on 4 November 1869. Although most scientific journals are now highly specialized, Nature is one of the few journals, along with other weekly journals such as Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, that still publishes original research articles across a wide range of scientific fields. In many fields of scientific research, important new advances and original research are published as articles or letters in Nature.

Research scientists are the primary audience for the journal, but summaries and accompanying articles make many of the most important papers understandable for the general public and to scientists in other fields. Toward the front of each issue are editorials, news and feature articles on issues of general interest to scientists, including current affairs, science funding, business, scientific ethics and research breakthroughs. There are also sections on books and arts. The remainder of the journal consists mostly of research articles, which are often dense and highly technical. Due to strict limits on the length of articles, in many cases the printed text is actually a summary of the work in question with many details relegated to accompanying supplementary material on the journal's website.

In 2007 Nature (together with Science) received the Prince of Asturias Award for Communications and Humanity.

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