Related topics: protein

Veterinary researchers uncover novel amyloidosis

A collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has discovered a novel amyloid protein from canine mammary tumors. This amyloid protein, α-S1 casein, normally plays a vital ...

A plethora of plant molecules provides a ple"flora" of data

Researchers at the University of Geneva have established a searchable library of spectra and molecules found in a collection of 1,600 plant extracts. This collection was accessed through a collaboration with Pierre Fabre ...

The proteins that fix (almost) everything

Proteins can make any inventor green with envy. It is proteins that make the body work. But when these same super-substances make mistakes, we may get sick with things like cancer or Alzheimer's disease. The job of researchers ...

Enzyme 'atlas' helps researchers decipher cellular pathways

One of the most important classes of human enzymes are protein kinases—signaling molecules that regulate nearly all cellular activities, including growth, cell division, and metabolism. Dysfunction in these cellular pathways ...

A win-win for cell communities: Cells that cooperate live longer

When cells exchange metabolic products with other cells, they live longer. This new finding comes from a research team at Charité–Universitätsmedizin Berlin, which made the discovery in a study using yeast cells. The ...

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Mass spectrometry

Mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical technique for the determination of the elemental composition of a sample or molecule. It is also used for elucidating the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds. The MS principle consists of ionizing chemical compounds to generate charged molecules or molecule fragments and measurement of their mass-to-charge ratios. In a typical MS procedure:

MS instruments consist of three modules: an ion source, which can convert gas phase sample molecules into ions (or, in the case of electrospray ionization, move ions that exist in solution into the gas phase); a mass analyzer, which sorts the ions by their masses by applying electromagnetic fields; and a detector, which measures the value of an indicator quantity and thus provides data for calculating the abundances of each ion present. The technique has both qualitative and quantitative uses. These include identifying unknown compounds, determining the isotopic composition of elements in a molecule, and determining the structure of a compound by observing its fragmentation. Other uses include quantifying the amount of a compound in a sample or studying the fundamentals of gas phase ion chemistry (the chemistry of ions and neutrals in a vacuum). MS is now in very common use in analytical laboratories that study physical, chemical, or biological properties of a great variety of compounds.

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