Related topics: liver disease · hepatitis · liver cells · hepatitis c · cells

Liver fluke linked to liver disease in U.K. horses

A harmful parasite that costs the U.K. cattle and sheep industry an estimated £300 million per year may also be an under‐recognised cause of liver disease in horses, a study by the University of Liverpool has found.

Study shows interactions between bacteria and parasites

A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has completed the first study of the effects of a simultaneous infection with blood flukes (schistosomes) and the bacterium Helicobacter pylori—a fairly common occurrence ...

Malaria could be felled by an Antarctic sea sponge

The frigid waters of the Antarctic may yield a treatment for a deadly disease that affects populations in some of the hottest places on earth. Current medications for that scourge—malaria—are becoming less effective as ...

Keeping your dog safe from toxic blue-green algae

When we see green, scummy water, we know better than to drink it or even swim in it. But the same is not true for many dogs, and that green scum could be a toxic blue-green algae bloom, which can be fatal to animals.

Hepatitis B: Unusual virus discovered in shrews

The discovery of an unusual hepatitis B virus from shrews offers new opportunities of better understanding the chronic progression of the disease. International research teams were able to demonstrate that an important protein ...

Malaria hijacks your genes to invade your liver

In the search for new weapons against malaria, most drug development has focused on the parasites that cause the disease. But Duke University researchers are trying a different tack. Instead of targeting the malaria parasite ...

Major breakthrough to help clean up toxic PFAS pollution

A joint research project between the University of South Australia and Flinders University has developed a new technique to clean up toxic polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) from waterways.

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Liver

The liver is a vital organ present in vertebrates and some other animals; it has a wide range of functions, a few of which are detoxification, protein synthesis, and production of biochemicals necessary for digestion. The liver is necessary for survival; there is currently no way to compensate for the absence of liver function.

This organ plays a major role in metabolism and has a number of functions in the body, including glycogen storage, decomposition of red blood cells, plasma protein synthesis, hormone production, and detoxification. It lies below the diaphragm in the thoracic region of the abdomen. It produces bile, an alkaline compound which aids in digestion, via the emulsification of lipids. It also performs and regulates a wide variety of high-volume biochemical reactions requiring highly specialized tissues, including the synthesis and breakdown of small and complex molecules, many of which are necessary for normal vital functions.

Medical terms related to the liver often start in hepato- or hepatic from the Greek word for liver, hēpar (ήπαρ).

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