Related topics: liver disease · hepatitis · liver cells · hepatitis c · cells

Harnessing the healing power within our cells

University of Queensland researchers have identified a pathway in cells that could be used to reprogram the body's immune system to fight back against both chronic inflammatory and infectious diseases.

Toxoplasmosis—the pathogen with a molecular master key

One of the most widespread zoonoses worldwide, toxoplasmosis is an infectious disease that is caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Although cats are the final host, the parasite can infest any warm-blooded animal, including ...

Researchers compile ethnopharmacology of genus Veronicastrum

The genus Veronicastrum (Plantaginaceae) has about 20 species in the world with a distribution in eastern Asia and North America. Species in the genus Veronicastrum are beautiful perennial herbs with mostly alternate leaves, ...

Feline genetics help pinpoint first-ever domestication of cats

Nearly 10,000 years ago, humans settling in the Fertile Crescent, the areas of the Middle East surrounding the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, made the first switch from hunter-gatherers to farmers. They developed close bonds ...

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Liver

The liver is a vital organ present in vertebrates and some other animals; it has a wide range of functions, a few of which are detoxification, protein synthesis, and production of biochemicals necessary for digestion. The liver is necessary for survival; there is currently no way to compensate for the absence of liver function.

This organ plays a major role in metabolism and has a number of functions in the body, including glycogen storage, decomposition of red blood cells, plasma protein synthesis, hormone production, and detoxification. It lies below the diaphragm in the thoracic region of the abdomen. It produces bile, an alkaline compound which aids in digestion, via the emulsification of lipids. It also performs and regulates a wide variety of high-volume biochemical reactions requiring highly specialized tissues, including the synthesis and breakdown of small and complex molecules, many of which are necessary for normal vital functions.

Medical terms related to the liver often start in hepato- or hepatic from the Greek word for liver, hēpar (ήπαρ).

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