Machine learning tracks moving cells

Both developing babies and elderly adults share a common characteristic: the many cells making up their bodies are always on the move. As we humans commute to work, cells migrate through the body to get their jobs done. Biologists ...

Scientists study genes misidentified as 'non-protein coding'

The human genome contains regions that "code" for proteins, which means they have instructions to make protein molecules with specific functions in the body. But Yale researchers have discovered several protein-coding genes ...

Tissue chips rocket to International Space Station

When traveling in space, astronauts experience physiological changes normally associated with aging, such as bone loss, muscle deterioration and altered immune systems. When the astronauts return to Earth, the changes often ...

New algorithm enables data integration at single-cell resolution

A team of computational biologists has developed an algorithm that can 'align' multiple sequencing datasets with single-cell resolution. The new method, published today in the journal Nature Biotechnology, has implications ...

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